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1. Biomedical articles (top 50; 2009 to 2014)
1. ||||||.... 65%  Campos-Miño S, Sasbón JS, von Dessauer B: [Pediatric intensive care in Latin America]. Med Intensiva; 2012 Jan-Feb;36(1):3-10
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Pediatric intensive care in Latin America].
  • [Transliterated title] Los cuidados intensivos pediátricos en Latinoamérica.
  • OBJECTIVE: To describe the practice of pediatric intensive care in Latin America and compare it with two European countries.
  • DESIGN: Analysis of data presented by member countries of the Sociedad Latinoamericana de Cuidado Intensivo Pediátrico (SLACIP), Spain and Portugal, in the context of a Symposium of Spanish and Portuguese - speaking pediatric intensivists during the Fifth World Congress on Pediatric Intensive Care.
  • SETTING: Pediatric intensive care units (PICUs).
  • PARTICIPANTS: Pediatric intensivists in representation of each member country of the SLACIP, Spain and Portugal.
  • VARIABLES OF INTEREST: Each country presented its data on child health, medical facilities for children, pediatric intensive care units, pediatric intensivists, certification procedures, equipment, morbidity, mortality, and issues requiring intervention in each participating country.
  • Mean PICU mortality was 13.29% in Latin America and 5% in the European countries (P=0.005).
  • There was an inverse relationship between mortality and availability of pediatric intensive care units, pediatric intensivists, number of beds, and number of pediatric specialty centers.
  • Mortality shows an inverse correlation to the availability of pediatric intensive care units, intensive care beds, pediatric intensivists, and pediatric subspecialty centers.
  • [MeSH-major] Intensive Care Units, Pediatric / statistics & numerical data
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Age Distribution. Child. Child, Preschool. Developing Countries. Diagnosis-Related Groups. Health Services Needs and Demand. Health Status Indicators. Hospital Mortality. Humans. Infant. Infant Mortality. Infant, Newborn. Intensive Care Units, Neonatal / statistics & numerical data. Intensive Care Units, Neonatal / supply & distribution. Latin America. Patient Admission. Pediatrics / education. Pediatrics / manpower. Portugal. Societies, Medical. Spain. Technology, High-Cost / statistics & numerical data

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 21906846.001).
  • [ISSN] 1578-6749
  • [Journal-full-title] Medicina intensiva / Sociedad Española de Medicina Intensiva y Unidades Coronarias
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med Intensiva
  • [Language] spa
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Spain
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2. ||........ 24%  Singhai M, Malik A, Shahid M, Malik MA, Goyal R: A study on device-related infections with special reference to biofilm production and antibiotic resistance. J Glob Infect Dis; 2012 Oct;4(4):193-8
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  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study was done on 135 hospitalized (Intensive care units) pediatric patients with IMDs (intravascular catheter, urinary catheter, and endotracheal tube) to determine the device-specific infection rates.
  • The tube method is an effective screening method to test biofilm production, where sophisticated microscopy facilities are not available.

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  • (PMID = 23326076.001).
  • [ISSN] 0974-777X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of global infectious diseases
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Glob Infect Dis
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] India
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3543538
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Biofilms / Device-related infection / ESβL / MRSA / Scanning electron microscopy
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3. |......... 14%  Fogaça Mde C, Brunow de Carvalho W, Nogueira-Martins LA: [Demands and control of work: implications in pediatric and neonatal intensive care units]. Rev Bras Enferm; 2010 Jul-Aug;63(4):529-32
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  • [Title] [Demands and control of work: implications in pediatric and neonatal intensive care units].
  • [Transliterated title] Demandas do trabalho e controle: implicações em unidades de terapia intensiva pediátrica e neonatal.
  • To compare the demand and control over work of physicians and nurses working in pediatric and neonatal critical care units.
  • Physicians from the ICU Neonatal differ in social support received from the supervisor (p= 0.01) compared to the ICU Pediatric.
  • ICU nurses of the Neonatal present job insecurity (p= 0.05).
  • Physicians and nurses from the ICU Pediatric differ in control over the work, psychological demands of work, physical effort and support of the supervisor (p <0.05).
  • Physicians and nurses from the ICU Neonatal show statistical differences in control over the work, physical effort and support of the supervisor (p<0.05).
  • The work environment in the ICU'S presents high demand and low control over the work.
  • [MeSH-major] Intensive Care Units, Pediatric. Workload
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Cross-Sectional Studies. Female. Humans. Intensive Care Units, Neonatal. Male. Pediatric Nursing. Pediatrics. Questionnaires

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  • (PMID = 20835655.001).
  • [ISSN] 0034-7167
  • [Journal-full-title] Revista brasileira de enfermagem
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rev Bras Enferm
  • [Language] por
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Brazil
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4. |......... 11%  Edwards JD, Houtrow AJ, Vasilevskis EE, Dudley RA, Okumura MJ: Multi-institutional profile of adults admitted to pediatric intensive care units. JAMA Pediatr; 2013 May;167(5):436-43
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  • [Title] Multi-institutional profile of adults admitted to pediatric intensive care units.
  • Many use pediatric hospitals for their inpatient needs.
  • To our knowledge, the prevalence and characteristics of adult pediatric intensive care unit patients have not been reported.
  • OBJECTIVES: To estimate the proportion of adults admitted to pediatric intensive care units (PICUs), characterize them, and compare them with older adolescents.
  • SETTING: Pediatric intensive care units in the United States that participated in the Virtual Pediatric Intensive Care Unit Systems.
  • PARTICIPANTS: Pediatric intensive care unit patients 15 years or older admitted in 2008.
  • Mixed-effects logistic regression was used to estimate the independent association of age with PICU mortality.
  • The proportion of adults (≥19 years) varied considerably by PICU (range, 0%-9.2%).
  • Patients aged 21 to 29 years had a 2 times (95% CI, 1.3-3.2; P = .004) greater odds of PICU mortality compared with adolescent patients, after adjusting for Paediatric Index of Mortality score, sex, trauma, and having a complex chronic condition.
  • [MeSH-major] Intensive Care Units, Pediatric / utilization
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Age Distribution. Chronic Disease / mortality. Chronic Disease / therapy. Critical Illness / mortality. Critical Illness / therapy. Cross-Sectional Studies. Female. Hospital Mortality. Humans. Logistic Models. Male. Middle Aged. Patient Admission / statistics & numerical data. Transition to Adult Care. United States / epidemiology. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 23549637.001).
  • [ISSN] 2168-6211
  • [Journal-full-title] JAMA pediatrics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] JAMA Pediatr
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / AHRQ HHS / HS / K08 HS017716; United States / PHS HHS / / K12 H001097; United States / NICHD NIH HHS / HD / K12 HD 047349; United States / NIA NIH HHS / AG / K23 AG040157; United States / NIA NIH HHS / AG / K23 AG040157; United States / NICHD NIH HHS / HD / L40 HD059390; United States / NICHD NIH HHS / HD / L40 HD074149; United States / NHLBI NIH HHS / HL / L40 HL090709
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS479430; NLM/ PMC3700534
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5. |......... 11%  Basnet S, Adhikari N, Koirala J: Challenges in setting up pediatric and neonatal intensive care units in a resource-limited country. Pediatrics; 2011 Oct;128(4):e986-92
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  • [Title] Challenges in setting up pediatric and neonatal intensive care units in a resource-limited country.
  • In collaboration with a host country and international medical volunteers, a PICU and an NICU were conceptualized and realized in the developing country of Nepal.
  • We present here the challenges that were encountered during and after the establishment of these units.
  • The decision to develop an ICU with reasonable goals in a developing country has to be made with careful assessments of need of that patient population and ethical principles guiding appropriate use of limited resources.
  • Considerations during unit design include space allocation, limited supply of electricity, oxygen source, and clean-water availability.
  • Budgetary challenges might place overall sustainability at stake, which can also lead to attrition of trained manpower and affect the quality of care.
  • Those working in the PICU in resource-poor nations perpetually face the challenges of lack of expert support (subspecialists), diagnostic facilities (laboratory and radiology), and appropriate medications and equipment.
  • The staff in these units must make difficult decisions on effective triage of admissions to the units on the basis of individual cases, futility of care, availability of resources, and financial ability of the family.
  • [MeSH-major] Developing Countries. Health Planning. Intensive Care Units, Pediatric / organization & administration
  • [MeSH-minor] Child. Education, Nursing, Continuing. Electricity. Equipment and Supplies, Hospital / economics. Equipment and Supplies, Hospital / supply & distribution. Health Care Rationing. Hospital Volunteers. Humans. Infant, Newborn. Intensive Care Units, Neonatal / organization & administration. Nepal. Outcome Assessment (Health Care). Personnel Selection. Transportation of Patients. Water Supply

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  • (PMID = 21930539.001).
  • [ISSN] 1098-4275
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatrics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatrics
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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6. |......... 10%  Li JJ, Chen YF, Lin YX: [Investigation of disease spectrum in the PICU of Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University between 2005 and 2012]. Zhongguo Dang Dai Er Ke Za Zhi; 2013 Jun;15(6):472-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Investigation of disease spectrum in the PICU of Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University between 2005 and 2012].
  • OBJECTIVE: To summarize the spectrum of disease and common diseases that cause death in children admitted to the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU), Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University between 2005 and 2012.
  • METHODS: A retrospective analysis was carried out on the clinical data of 4484 children admitted to the PICU of Shengjing Hospital between 2005 and 2012.
  • RESULTS: Acute bronchopneumonia, which was found in 1099 (24.51%) of the 4484 cases, was the most common disease in the PICU between 2005 and 2012.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Acute bronchopneumonia was the most common disease in the PICU of Shengjing Hospital between 2005 and 2012, but the spectrum of disease changed over time.
  • The mortality showed a decreasing trend among the children in the PICU between 2005 and 2012, and the main causes of death included severe acute bronchial pneumonia and severe sepsis.
  • [MeSH-major] Intensive Care Units, Pediatric / statistics & numerical data

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  • (PMID = 23791065.001).
  • [ISSN] 1008-8830
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhongguo dang dai er ke za zhi = Chinese journal of contemporary pediatrics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhongguo Dang Dai Er Ke Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] China
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7. |......... 10%  Fogaça Mde C, de Carvalho WB, Nogueira-Martins LA: [Preliminary study about qualify of life of physicians and nurses working in pediatric and neonatal intensive care units]. Rev Esc Enferm USP; 2010 Sep;44(3):708-12
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Preliminary study about qualify of life of physicians and nurses working in pediatric and neonatal intensive care units].
  • [Transliterated title] Estudo preliminar sobre a qualidade de vida de médicos e enfermeiros intensivistas pediátricos e neonatais.
  • Compare the Quality of Life (QL) of doctors and nurses who work in Pediatric (PED) and Neonatal (NEO) Intensive Care Units, and to evaluate whether there are differences between the QL in the same job category, but differing according to the work unit.
  • The QL assessment of physicians and nurses working in pediatric and neonatal intensive care units was below the scores found in scientific literature, compared to studies that evaluated patients with chronic pain and mental health disorders, indicating the occurrence of occupational stress.
  • [MeSH-major] Intensive Care Units, Pediatric. Nurses. Occupational Health. Physicians. Quality of Life
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Female. Humans. Intensive Care Units, Neonatal. Male

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  • (PMID = 20964048.001).
  • [ISSN] 0080-6234
  • [Journal-full-title] Revista da Escola de Enfermagem da U S P
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rev Esc Enferm USP
  • [Language] por
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Brazil
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8. |||....... 30%  Collados Gómez L, Jara Casas TO, Sánchez-Alarcos de la Serna M, Calderari Fernández E, Rodríguez Quesada A: [Hospitalized children's parents' anxiety in critical care units]. Rev Enferm; 2012 Feb;35(2):42-7
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Hospitalized children's parents' anxiety in critical care units].
  • [Transliterated title] Ansiedad en padres de niños hospitalizados en unidades críticas.
  • OBJECTIVE: Describe the anxiety that the parents of admitted children at a Intensive Care Units, Pediatric (PICU) and/or Neonatal (NICU) during the first week of hospitalization.
  • MATERIAL AND METHOD: Observational study descriptive, transversal conducted at the Gregorio Marañón Hospital, in PICU and NICU.
  • All these actions are directed towards an integral attention taking into account the family as the unit.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Child. Critical Care. Cross-Sectional Studies. Female. Humans. Intensive Care Units. Male

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  • (PMID = 22670384.001).
  • [ISSN] 0210-5020
  • [Journal-full-title] Revista de enfermería (Barcelona, Spain)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Rev Enferm
  • [Language] spa
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Spain
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9. |||....... 28%  McWilliams K, Keeley PW, Waterhouse ET: Propofol for terminal sedation in palliative care: a systematic review. J Palliat Med; 2010 Jan;13(1):73-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Propofol for terminal sedation in palliative care: a systematic review.
  • INCLUSIONS: Prospective or retrospective trials (controlled or uncontrolled) or case series of propofol for sedation in advanced incurable disease in either generalist setting or specialist palliative care units.
  • EXCLUSIONS: Use in anesthetic or intensivist settings (e.g., intensive care units); pediatric use.
  • Identification of relevant studies: Using the search terms: [Hospice Care/OR Terminal Care/OR Palliative Care/OR palliative.mp] AND [Propofol/].
  • Hand searches of a number of palliative care journals were also undertaken (Palliative Medicine, Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, Progress in Palliative Care, Journal of Palliative Care, Journal of Palliative Medicine).
  • [MeSH-major] Hypnotics and Sedatives / therapeutic use. Palliative Care. Propofol / therapeutic use
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Terminal Care

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  • (PMID = 19827968.001).
  • [ISSN] 1557-7740
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of palliative medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Palliat Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Hypnotics and Sedatives; YI7VU623SF / Propofol
  • [Number-of-references] 15
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10. |......... 14%  Beer M, Wirth C, Neubauer H, Wirbelauer J: [Radiology in pediatric intensive care units]. Med Klin Intensivmed Notfmed; 2011 Oct;106(2):103-10
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Radiology in pediatric intensive care units].
  • The role of diagnostic imaging in pediatric intensive care units (PICU) includes primary diagnosis, monitoring of the patient's progress, and the assessment of interventional procedures.
  • Images should be acquired in the PICU, not only to minimize the time interval between image acquisition and image interpretation but also in order to avoid unnecessary and maybe harmful transportation of the patient.
  • Thorough consideration of radiation protection based on optimized equipment also includes the protection of relatives and other children in the PICU room.
  • [MeSH-major] Diagnostic Imaging. Intensive Care Units, Pediatric
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Child. Child, Preschool. Female. Fluoroscopy. Humans. Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted. Infant. Infant, Newborn. Infant, Premature, Diseases / diagnosis. Intensive Care Units, Neonatal. Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Male. Point-of-Care Systems. Prognosis. Radiation Protection. Radiography. Radiography, Thoracic. Tomography, X-Ray Computed. Treatment Outcome. Ultrasonography

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  • (PMID = 22038634.001).
  • [ISSN] 2193-6226
  • [Journal-full-title] Medizinische Klinik, Intensivmedizin und Notfallmedizin
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med Klin Intensivmed Notfmed
  • [Language] ger
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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11. |......... 10%  Mello MJ, Albuquerque Mde F, Lacerda HR, Souza WV, Correia JB, Britto MC: Risk factors for healthcare-associated infection in pediatric intensive care units: a systematic review. Cad Saude Publica; 2009;25 Suppl 3:S373-91
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Risk factors for healthcare-associated infection in pediatric intensive care units: a systematic review.
  • A systematic review of observational studies on risk factors for healthcare-associated infection in pediatric Intensive Care Units (ICU) was carried out.
  • Key words for search were 'cross infection' and 'Pediatric Intensive Care Units' with others sub-terms included.
  • The production of evidence on risk factors Paediatric ICU has not kept up the same pace of that on adult - there are few studies with adequate design and statistical analysis.
  • The methodological diversity of the studies did not allow for a summarized measurement of risk factors.
  • [MeSH-major] Cross Infection / prevention & control. Intensive Care Units, Pediatric
  • [MeSH-minor] Child. Delivery of Health Care. Humans. Respiratory Tract Infections / prevention & control. Risk Factors. Urinary Tract Infections / prevention & control

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  • (PMID = 20027386.001).
  • [ISSN] 1678-4464
  • [Journal-full-title] Cadernos de saúde pública
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Cad Saude Publica
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Brazil
  • [Number-of-references] 127
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12. |......... 10%  Brooten D, Youngblut JM, Seagrave L, Caicedo C, Hawthorne D, Hidalgo I, Roche R: Parent's perceptions of health care providers actions around child ICU death: what helped, what did not. Am J Hosp Palliat Care; 2013 Feb;30(1):40-9
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  • [Title] Parent's perceptions of health care providers actions around child ICU death: what helped, what did not.
  • PURPOSE: To describe parents' perspectives of health care provider actions that helped or did not around the time of infant/child's intensive care unit (ICU) death.
  • FINDINGS: What helped most: compassionate, sensitive staff; understandable explanations of infant's/child's condition; experienced, competent nurses; providers did everything to help infant/child; and parents' involvement in care decisions.
  • What did not help: insensitive, nonsupportive staff; conflict between providers and parents; communication problems around the death; inexperienced nurses and doctors; parents not understanding child's disease, care, complications.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Compassionate, sensitive staff and understandable explanations of children's conditions were most helpful; insensitive, nonsupportive staff least helpful by gender, racial group, or care setting.
  • [MeSH-major] Attitude of Health Personnel. Intensive Care Units, Pediatric / organization & administration. Parents / psychology. Perception. Professional-Family Relations
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Child. Child, Hospitalized. Communication. Empathy. Ethnic Groups. Female. Humans. Infant. Intensive Care Units, Neonatal / statistics & numerical data. Interviews as Topic. Male. Middle Aged. Sex Factors

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  • (PMID = 22531149.001).
  • [ISSN] 1938-2715
  • [Journal-full-title] The American journal of hospice & palliative care
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am J Hosp Palliat Care
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NINR NIH HHS / NR / R01 NR009120; United States / NINR NIH HHS / NR / R01 NR009120
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS426448; NLM/ PMC3532561
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13. |......... 9%  Cabeza B, García Ruíz S, González-Abad MJ, Nieto-Moro M, Martínez de Azagra A, Iglesias-Bouzas MI, Casado-Flores J: [Staphylococcus aureus infections in the intensive care unit: clinical and epidemiological characteristics]. An Pediatr (Barc); 2012 Dec;77(6):403-12
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  • [Title] [Staphylococcus aureus infections in the intensive care unit: clinical and epidemiological characteristics].
  • [Transliterated title] Infecciones por Staphylococcus aureus en cuidados intensivos: características clínicas y epidemiológicas.
  • INTRODUCTION: There has been an increase in invasive Staphylococcus Aureus infections over the last few years, which have required admission to the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU).
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: All patients with S. aureus infection who were admitted to PICU were enrolled in a retrospective study (January 2006-June 2010).
  • [MeSH-major] Intensive Care Units, Pediatric. Staphylococcal Infections / diagnosis. Staphylococcal Infections / epidemiology

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2011 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 22748965.001).
  • [ISSN] 1695-9531
  • [Journal-full-title] Anales de pediatría (Barcelona, Spain : 2003)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] An Pediatr (Barc)
  • [Language] spa
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Spain
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14. |......... 9%  Tritschler T, Sennhauser F, Frey B: Are immigrant children admitted to intensive care at increased risk? Swiss Med Wkly; 2011;141:w13190
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  • [Title] Are immigrant children admitted to intensive care at increased risk?
  • BACKGROUND: Racial and ethnic disparities in health care are significant predictors of the quality of health care received.
  • Studies documenting these disparities are largely based on an adult chronic care model.
  • There are only few reports in paediatric populations.
  • Our objective was to evaluate the severity of illness of immigrants at admission to PICU, the proportion of immigrants in PICU compared to the general population and the quality of care they receive, in order to examine whether there are disparities in health care.
  • METHODS: Prospectively collected data of 1009 sequential first admissions in 2007 to a multidisciplinary, 19-bed, PICU of a university children's hospital in Switzerland.
  • The main outcome measures were expected mortality, standardised mortality ratio, proportion of immigrants in general population and in PICU.
  • RESULTS: Children with an immigrant background are overrepresented in PICU compared with their proportion in the general population.
  • Parents of these children are more likely to be in the lowest strata of socio-professional status than parents of Swiss children hospitalised in PICU (relative risk 9.82, 95% CI 5.16 to 18.7).
  • CONCLUSIONS: These findings indicate that disparities may exist at a lower level of illness severity, due to many possible reasons (for example shortcomings in primary health care).
  • However, once a child enters tertiary health care, nationality and socio-economic factors no longer influence quality of health care delivery.
  • [MeSH-major] Emigrants and Immigrants. Intensive Care Units, Pediatric

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  • (PMID = 21528465.001).
  • [ISSN] 1424-3997
  • [Journal-full-title] Swiss medical weekly
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Swiss Med Wkly
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Switzerland
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15. |......... 9%  Lanetzki CS, de Oliveira CA, Bass LM, Abramovici S, Troster EJ: The epidemiological profile of Pediatric Intensive Care Center at Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein. Einstein (Sao Paulo); 2012 Jan-Mar;10(1):16-21
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  • [Title] The epidemiological profile of Pediatric Intensive Care Center at Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein.
  • OBJECTIVE: This study outlined the epidemiological profiles of patients who were admitted to the Pediatric Intensive Care Center at Albert Einstein Israelite Hospital during 2009.
  • Respiratory diseases were the main cause for admission to the Pediatric Intensive Care Center, and the mortality rate of the patients admitted was 1.85%.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Respiratory diseases were the most common ailment among patients admitted to the Pediatric Intensive Care Center, and the highest mortality rates were associated with neoplastic diseases.
  • [MeSH-major] Hospitals, Pediatric / statistics & numerical data. Intensive Care Units, Pediatric / statistics & numerical data

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  • (PMID = 23045820.001).
  • [ISSN] 1679-4508
  • [Journal-full-title] Einstein (São Paulo, Brazil)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Einstein (Sao Paulo)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Brazil
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16. |......... 12%  Namachivayam P, Shann F, Shekerdemian L, Taylor A, van Sloten I, Delzoppo C, Daffey C, Butt W: Three decades of pediatric intensive care: Who was admitted, what happened in intensive care, and what happened afterward. Pediatr Crit Care Med; 2010 Sep;11(5):549-55
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  • [Title] Three decades of pediatric intensive care: Who was admitted, what happened in intensive care, and what happened afterward.
  • OBJECTIVE: To describe the characteristics of children admitted to intensive care in 1982, 1995, and 2005-2006, and their long-term outcome.
  • SETTING: Pediatric intensive care unit in a university-affiliated children's hospital.
  • DESIGN/METHODS: Information for 2005-2006 admissions was obtained from pediatric intensive care unit database, and long-term outcome was ascertained through telephone interviews.
  • Among children aged > or =1 month, pediatric intensive care unit length of stay remained constant.
  • The risk of death predicted by the Pediatric Index of Mortality (PIM) remained constant (approximately 6%) between 1995 and 2005-2006.The proportion that died in the pediatric intensive care unit fell from 11.0% in 1982 to 4.8% in 2005-2006 (p < .001).
  • The proportion of children aged > or =1 month who either died in the pediatric intensive care unit or survived with disability did not improve: it was 19.4% in 1982 and 22.7% in 2005-2006.
  • CONCLUSION: Over the last three decades, the length of stay in the pediatric intensive care unit and the severity of illness have not changed, but there has been a substantial reduction in pediatric intensive care unit mortality.
  • [MeSH-major] Intensive Care Units, Pediatric / statistics & numerical data

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  • [CommentIn] Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2010 Sep;11(5):630-1 [20823736.001]
  • (PMID = 20124947.001).
  • [ISSN] 1529-7535
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric critical care medicine : a journal of the Society of Critical Care Medicine and the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr Crit Care Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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17. |......... 12%  Ventre KM, Wolf GK, Arnold JH: Pediatric respiratory diseases: 2011 update for the Rogers' Textbook of Pediatric Intensive Care. Pediatr Crit Care Med; 2011 May;12(3):325-38
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Pediatric respiratory diseases: 2011 update for the Rogers' Textbook of Pediatric Intensive Care.
  • OBJECTIVES: To review articles relevant to the field of pediatric respiratory disease that were published after the 2008 Rogers' Textbook of Pediatric Intensive Care.
  • DATA SOURCES: The authors searched the PubMed database (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez) from the National Library of Medicine for citations from the pediatric and adult literature relevant to pediatric status asthmaticus, bronchiolitis, pneumonia, acute lung injury, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and neonatal respiratory failure.
  • STUDY SELECTION AND DATA EXTRACTION: The authors reviewed the promising articles and the decision to include any article in the review was based on its potential to inform pediatric intensive care practice or future research.
  • CONCLUSIONS: There have been important new developments relevant to the pathogenesis and management of pediatric respiratory diseases.
  • [MeSH-major] Intensive Care Units, Pediatric. Respiratory Tract Diseases

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  • (PMID = 21378592.001).
  • [ISSN] 1529-7535
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric critical care medicine : a journal of the Society of Critical Care Medicine and the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr Crit Care Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
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18. |......... 12%  Ibsen LM, Conyers PM, Pate MF: Providing adult and pediatric care in the same unit: multiple considerations. AACN Adv Crit Care; 2013 Apr-Jun;24(2):117-20
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  • [Title] Providing adult and pediatric care in the same unit: multiple considerations.
  • As always in acute and critical care, preparation is fundamental to positive patient and family outcomes.
  • Although integration of diverse age populations may occur rarely in a unit, strategic planning should be in place for such occurrences,with relevant competencies considered, addressed, and evaluated on a continuing basis.
  • [MeSH-major] Intensive Care Units. Intensive Care Units, Pediatric

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  • [ErratumIn] AACN Adv Crit Care. 2013 Jul-Sep;24(3):254
  • (PMID = 23615008.001).
  • [ISSN] 1559-7776
  • [Journal-full-title] AACN advanced critical care
  • [ISO-abbreviation] AACN Adv Crit Care
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
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19. |......... 12%  Trubuhovich RV: Pioneering paediatric intensive care medicine in New Zealand. Anaesth Intensive Care; 2013 Sep;41(5):655-70
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  • [Title] Pioneering paediatric intensive care medicine in New Zealand.
  • The origin of New Zealand's paediatric intensive care medicine lay in the formal establishment of Auckland Hospital's Central Respiratory Unit within the hospital's Infectious Diseases Unit (December 1958).
  • It was initially established for the care of critically ill children, chiefly with airway and respiratory disorders or tetanus.
  • Rapid build-up of paediatric admissions-36 in 1963 becoming 104 in 1969-is detailed through Dr Spence's admirable annual reports for that period, which also provide the evidence of his organisational brilliance and personal commitment to development of the unit.
  • Critically ill children were occasionally flown into Auckland; others were cared for regionally as further intensive care units developed throughout New Zealand.
  • At the end of 1991, the (now) Department of Critical Care Medicine completed its paediatric role over three decades, with care of children passing to a paediatric intensive care unit in the new Auckland paediatric hospital (soon to be called "Starship").
  • Regional intensive care units still make a substantial contribution to paediatric intensive care countrywide.
  • [MeSH-major] Intensive Care Units, Pediatric / history

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  • (PMID = 23977918.001).
  • [ISSN] 0310-057X
  • [Journal-full-title] Anaesthesia and intensive care
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Anaesth Intensive Care
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Historical Article; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Australia
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; IPPV / airway / brain injury / convulsions / history / intensive care medicine / intubation / paediatric / tracheostomy
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20. |......... 11%  Roussak P: Centralisation of paediatric intensive care and a 24-hour retrieval service. Br J Nurs; 2014 Jan 9-22;23(1):25-9
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  • [Title] Centralisation of paediatric intensive care and a 24-hour retrieval service.
  • This article aims to analyse the effects of the centralisation of paediatric intensive care (PIC) and the requirement for a 24-hour retrieval service, as outlined in Standards for the Care of Critically Ill Children (Paediatric Intensive Care Society, 2010).
  • The introduction of more paediatric high-dependency care units in DGHs is presented as a solution to the increased burden on the retrieval service and the deskilling of staff.
  • [MeSH-major] Intensive Care Units, Pediatric. Patient Transfer

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  • (PMID = 24406493.001).
  • [ISSN] 0966-0461
  • [Journal-full-title] British journal of nursing (Mark Allen Publishing)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Br J Nurs
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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21. |......... 10%  Ortiz MI, Ortega-Franco F, Bautista-Rivas M, Romo-Hernández G, López-Cadena JM, Copca-García JA: Drug utilization in intensive care units in a pediatric hospital. Proc West Pharmacol Soc; 2009;52:24-5
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  • [Title] Drug utilization in intensive care units in a pediatric hospital.
  • The main objective of the present study was to investigate the use of drugs in the pediatric intensive care units (PICUs) at a pediatric hospital.
  • Data were collected and 57 different drugs were given to the pediatric patients.
  • Substantial variation exists in hospitalists' reported management of common pediatric conditions.
  • To decrease undesirable variation in care, a stronger evidence base for inpatient pediatric care must be built.
  • [MeSH-major] Drug Utilization. Intensive Care Units, Pediatric
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Hospitals, Pediatric. Humans. Infant. Male

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  • (PMID = 22128414.001).
  • [ISSN] 0083-8969
  • [Journal-full-title] Proceedings of the Western Pharmacology Society
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Proc. West. Pharmacol. Soc.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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22. |......... 10%  Straney LD, Clements A, Alexander J, Slater A: Measuring efficiency in Australian and New Zealand paediatric intensive care units. Intensive Care Med; 2010 Aug;36(8):1410-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Measuring efficiency in Australian and New Zealand paediatric intensive care units.
  • PURPOSE: To develop a measure of paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) efficiency and compare the efficiency of PICUs in Australia and New Zealand.
  • A standardised mortality ratio was calculated using a recalibrated Paediatric Index of Mortality 2 model.
  • A random effects length of stay (LoS) prediction model was used to provide an indicator of unit-level variation in resource use.
  • A modified Rapoport-Teres plot of risk-adjusted mortality versus unit mean LoS provided a visual representation of efficiency.
  • RESULTS: The modified plot provides a useful tool for visualising ICU efficiency.
  • Two units were identified as potentially inefficient with higher SMR and risk-adjusted mean LoS at the 95% level.
  • One unit had a significantly lower SMR and significantly higher risk-adjusted mean LoS.
  • Two units were designated as inefficient and one unit was considered to be effective at the expense of high resource use.
  • Application of these methods may help to identify inefficiencies in units located in other countries or regions.
  • [MeSH-major] Efficiency, Organizational. Intensive Care Units, Pediatric / standards
  • [MeSH-minor] Australia. Hospital Mortality / trends. Humans. Length of Stay. Models, Theoretical. New Zealand. Odds Ratio. Quality Indicators, Health Care. Risk Adjustment

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  • (PMID = 20502871.001).
  • [ISSN] 1432-1238
  • [Journal-full-title] Intensive care medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Intensive Care Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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23. |......... 10%  De Giorgi I, Guignard B, Fonzo-Christe C, Bonnabry P: Evaluation of tools to prevent drug incompatibilities in paediatric and neonatal intensive care units. Pharm World Sci; 2010 Aug;32(4):520-9
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Evaluation of tools to prevent drug incompatibilities in paediatric and neonatal intensive care units.
  • OBJECTIVE: Intravenous drug administration in neonatal (NICU) and paediatric intensive care units (PICU) is critical because of poor venous access, polymedication, fluid restriction and low infusion rate.
  • Eight decision-supporting tools were hence evaluated to improve the detection of drug incompatibilities in paediatric wards.
  • SETTING: NICU and PICU, University hospital.
  • [MeSH-major] Decision Support Systems, Clinical / standards. Drug Incompatibility. Drug Information Services / organization & administration. Intensive Care Units, Pediatric
  • [MeSH-minor] Drug Therapy, Combination. Hospitals, University. Humans. Infusions, Intravenous. Intensive Care Units, Neonatal. Medication Errors / prevention & control. Pharmacy Service, Hospital / organization & administration. Switzerland

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  • (PMID = 20556656.001).
  • [ISSN] 1573-739X
  • [Journal-full-title] Pharmacy world & science : PWS
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pharm World Sci
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
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24. |......... 10%  Tovar JA, Vazquez JJ: Management of chest trauma in children. Paediatr Respir Rev; 2013 Jun;14(2):86-91
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [MeSH-major] Disease Management. Intensive Care Units, Pediatric. Multiple Trauma. Thoracic Injuries

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 23598068.001).
  • [ISSN] 1526-0550
  • [Journal-full-title] Paediatric respiratory reviews
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Paediatr Respir Rev
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
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25. |......... 10%  Pate MF, Barshay C: Maintaining professional boundaries in the pediatric intensive care unit. AACN Adv Crit Care; 2012 Jul-Sep;23(3):242-5
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Maintaining professional boundaries in the pediatric intensive care unit.
  • Team members in the PICU need to have an understanding of the potential for professional boundary violations.
  • We hope that knowledge of the warning signs will help health care providers and patients and families remain in the zone of helpfulness.(3)
  • [MeSH-major] Intensive Care Units, Pediatric. Professional Competence
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Patient Care Team

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  • (PMID = 22828057.001).
  • [ISSN] 1559-7776
  • [Journal-full-title] AACN advanced critical care
  • [ISO-abbreviation] AACN Adv Crit Care
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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26. |......... 9%  de Mello MJ, de Albuquerque Mde F, Lacerda HR, Barbosa MT, de Alencar Ximenes RA: Risk factors for healthcare-associated infection in a pediatric intensive care unit. Pediatr Crit Care Med; 2010 Mar;11(2):246-52
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Risk factors for healthcare-associated infection in a pediatric intensive care unit.
  • OBJECTIVE: Identify risk factors for first-onset healthcare-associated infection (HAI) in a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU).
  • SETTING: Medical-surgical PICU in a hospital for patients in the public healthcare system.
  • PATIENTS: From January 2005 to June 2006, daily surveillance was carried out on 870 patients ages 0 to 18 yrs during their stay in the PICU through to 48 hrs after discharge (5773 patient-days).
  • In the multivariate logistic regression analysis, risk factors for first-onset HAI in the PICU (controlled for length of stay) were as follows: age under 2 years (odds ratio [OR]), 1.80; 95% confidence interval [CI]), 1.30-2.49); days on ventilator duration (OR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.08-1.25); transfused blood products (OR, 1.49; 95% CI, 1.08-2.06), glucocorticoids (OR, 1.45; 95% CI, 1.04-2.02) and H2 blockers (OR, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.05-2.06).
  • [MeSH-major] Cross Infection / epidemiology. Intensive Care Units, Pediatric

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  • [CommentIn] Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2010 Mar;11(2):308-10 [20216181.001]
  • (PMID = 19794325.001).
  • [ISSN] 1529-7535
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric critical care medicine : a journal of the Society of Critical Care Medicine and the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr Crit Care Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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27. |......... 9%  Frey B, Ersch J, Bernet V, Baenziger O, Enderli L, Doell C: Involvement of parents in critical incidents in a neonatal-paediatric intensive care unit. Qual Saf Health Care; 2009 Dec;18(6):446-9
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Involvement of parents in critical incidents in a neonatal-paediatric intensive care unit.
  • BACKGROUND: With more liberal visiting hours in paediatric intensive care practice, parents' presence at the bedside has increased.
  • The reports were analysed regarding involvement of parents, age of child, unit (paediatric intensive care or intermediate neonatal nursery), critical incident severity, critical incident category, actual or potential harm to patient and/or parent (minor, moderate, major), delay between the critical incident and its detection, and implemented system changes.
  • CONCLUSION: Because of their presence at the bedside, parents in the paediatric intensive care unit are inevitably involved in safety issues.
  • It is not the parents' duty to guarantee the safety for their children, but parents should be encouraged to report anything that worries them.
  • [MeSH-major] Intensive Care Units, Pediatric. Medical Errors. Parents
  • [MeSH-minor] Hospitals, Pediatric. Hospitals, University. Humans. Infant. Infant, Newborn. Intensive Care Units, Neonatal. Retrospective Studies

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  • (PMID = 19955455.001).
  • [ISSN] 1475-3901
  • [Journal-full-title] Quality & safety in health care
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Qual Saf Health Care
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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28. |......... 9%  Piastra M, Luca E, Mensi S, Visconti F, De Luca D, Vitale F, Pietrini D: Inotropic and vasoactive drugs in pediatric ICU. Curr Drug Targets; 2012 Jun;13(7):900-5
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  • [Title] Inotropic and vasoactive drugs in pediatric ICU.
  • Early diagnosis and prompt institution of adequate treatment may be life-saving for pediatric patients with cardiocirculatory instability in the setting of intensive care.
  • Identification and quantifying of pulmonary edema has also been recently appreciated in pediatric critical care.
  • [MeSH-major] Cardiovascular Agents / therapeutic use. Intensive Care Units, Pediatric

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  • (PMID = 22512389.001).
  • [ISSN] 1873-5592
  • [Journal-full-title] Current drug targets
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Curr Drug Targets
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Cardiovascular Agents
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29. |......... 9%  Gilmer MJ, Foster TL, Bell CJ, Mulder J, Carter BS: Parental perceptions of care of children at end of life. Am J Hosp Palliat Care; 2013 Feb;30(1):53-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Parental perceptions of care of children at end of life.
  • OBJECTIVE: Little is known regarding the perceptions of parents about end-of-life care for their children.
  • This study describes parental perceptions of the care of hospitalized, terminally ill children in the areas of (1) clinical management, (2) interdisciplinary support, and (3) pain and symptom management.
  • RESULTS: Data provided evidence of areas which lack satisfaction with elements of end-of-life care of hospitalized children.
  • Conclusion: Parental satisfaction with their child's care during end of life indicates need for improvement in pain management, communication, and parental involvement in decision making.
  • [MeSH-major] Communication. Consumer Satisfaction. Intensive Care Units, Pediatric / organization & administration. Parents / psychology. Terminal Care / organization & administration
  • [MeSH-minor] Attitude of Health Personnel. Child, Hospitalized. Child, Preschool. Decision Making. Female. Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice. Humans. Infant. Infant, Newborn. Intensive Care Units, Neonatal / organization & administration. Male. Pain Management / methods. Patient Care Team. Professional-Family Relations

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  • (PMID = 22495794.001).
  • [ISSN] 1938-2715
  • [Journal-full-title] The American journal of hospice & palliative care
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am J Hosp Palliat Care
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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30. |......... 9%  Prashanth GP, Pai VV: A retrospective cohort study of dermatological problems observed in paediatric intensive care unit. J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol; 2012 Sep;26(9):1105-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] A retrospective cohort study of dermatological problems observed in paediatric intensive care unit.
  • BACKGROUND: Dermatological manifestations are often encountered in paediatric intensive care units (PICU).
  • Spectrum of dermatological problems that may arise in critically ill children in intensive care unit remains unknown.
  • OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to find out the burden of dermatological problems and to describe the proportional distribution of paediatric dermatoses in ICU set-up.
  • METHODS: In a retrospective cohort study, we analysed all types of paediatric dermatological conditions manifesting in children admitted to a tertiary level ICU in South India.
  • RESULTS: During the study period of 25 months, 1180 new cases were admitted to PICU.
  • Infection was the leading cause of dermatoses in ICU.
  • Stevens-Johnson syndrome was the only primary dermatological condition leading to PICU admission in the present cohort.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The spectrum and proportional distribution of skin conditions in children differ from adult ICU-data.
  • Further large-scale investigations are needed to define the characteristics and distribution of infections along with other disease conditions leading to ICU-admissions and mortality among critically ill paediatric patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Intensive Care Units, Pediatric. Skin Diseases / diagnosis

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  • [Copyright] © 2011 The Authors. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2011 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.
  • (PMID = 21899603.001).
  • [ISSN] 1468-3083
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology : JEADV
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
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31. |......... 9%  Agarwal S, Classen D, Larsen G, Tofil NM, Hayes LW, Sullivan JE, Storgion SA, Coopes BJ, Craig V, Jaderlund C, Bisarya H, Parast L, Sharek P: Prevalence of adverse events in pediatric intensive care units in the United States. Pediatr Crit Care Med; 2010 Sep;11(5):568-78
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Prevalence of adverse events in pediatric intensive care units in the United States.
  • OBJECTIVES: Selection of relevant patient safety interventions for the pediatric intensive care (PICU) requires identification of the types and severity of adverse events (AEs) and adverse drug events (ADEs) that occur in this setting.
  • 1) determine the rates of AEs/ADEs, including types, severity, and preventability, in PICU patients;.
  • 3) develop and test a PICU specific trigger tool to facilitate identification of AEs/ADEs.
  • INTERVENTION: A novel PICU-focused trigger tool for AE/ADE detection.
  • MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: Sixty-two percent of PICU patients had at least one AE.
  • Higher adjusted rates of AEs were found in surgical patients (p = .02), patients intubated at some point during their PICU stay (p = .002), and patients who died (p < .001).
  • The adjusted cumulative risk of an AE per PICU day was 5.3% and 1.6% for an ADE alone.
  • CONCLUSIONS: AEs and ADEs occur frequently in the PICU setting.
  • These data provide areas of focus for evidence-based prevention strategies to decrease the substantial risk to this vulnerable pediatric population.
  • [MeSH-major] Intensive Care Units, Pediatric / statistics & numerical data. Medical Errors / statistics & numerical data

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  • [CommentIn] Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2010 Sep;11(5):632-3 [20823738.001]
  • (PMID = 20308932.001).
  • [ISSN] 1529-7535
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric critical care medicine : a journal of the Society of Critical Care Medicine and the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr Crit Care Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study
  • [Publication-country] United States
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32. |......... 9%  Kruessell MA, Udink ten Cate FE, Kraus AJ, Roth B, Trieschmann U: Use of propofol in pediatric intensive care units: a national survey in Germany. Pediatr Crit Care Med; 2012 May;13(3):e150-4
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  • [Title] Use of propofol in pediatric intensive care units: a national survey in Germany.
  • OBJECTIVE: Propofol is not licensed for sedation in pediatric intensive care medicine mainly due to the risk of propofol infusion syndrome.
  • Nevertheless, it is applied by many pediatric intensive care units.
  • The aim of this national survey was to asses the current use of propofol in pediatric intensive care units in Germany.
  • The questionnaire assessed the intensive care unit type, patient numbers, dosing, duration, age and time limits, indications, side effects, and institutional protocols for propofol usage.
  • SETTING: Pediatric intensive care units in Germany.
  • SUBJECTS: Questionnaire about routine use of propofol sent to 214 pediatric departments.
  • The final analysis comprised 184 questionnaires (134 pediatric/neonatal intensive care units, 28 pediatric intensive care units, 22 neonatal intensive care units).
  • Seventy-nine percent of intensive care units (n = 145 of 184) used propofol in children under the age of 16 yrs.
  • CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that propofol is used off-license by many pediatric intensive care units in Ge.
  • [MeSH-major] Drug Utilization / statistics & numerical data. Hypnotics and Sedatives. Intensive Care Units, Pediatric / statistics & numerical data. Off-Label Use / statistics & numerical data. Propofol
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Child. Child, Preschool. Germany. Health Care Surveys. Humans. Infant. Infant, Newborn. Intensive Care Units, Neonatal / statistics & numerical data. Questionnaires

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  • (PMID = 22079951.001).
  • [ISSN] 1529-7535
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric critical care medicine : a journal of the Society of Critical Care Medicine and the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr Crit Care Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Hypnotics and Sedatives; YI7VU623SF / Propofol
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33. |......... 9%  Bennett KS, Clark AE, Meert KL, Topjian AA, Schleien CL, Shaffner DH, Dean JM, Moler FW, Pediatric Emergency Care Medicine Applied Research Network: Early oxygenation and ventilation measurements after pediatric cardiac arrest: lack of association with outcome. Crit Care Med; 2013 Jun;41(6):1534-42
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  • [Title] Early oxygenation and ventilation measurements after pediatric cardiac arrest: lack of association with outcome.
  • We hypothesize that hyperoxia is common and associated with worse outcome after pediatric cardiac arrest.
  • SETTING: Fifteen hospitals within the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network.
  • MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Analysis of 195 events revealed that abnormalities in oxygenation and ventilation are common during the initial 6 hours after pediatric cardiac arrest.
  • After controlling for potential confounders, arrest location and rhythm were significantly associated with worse outcome; however, hyperoxia was not (odds ratio for good outcome, 1.02 [0.46, 2.84]; p = 0.96).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Despite recent resuscitation guidelines that advocate maintenance of normoxia and normoventilation after pediatric cardiac arrest, this is uncommonly achieved in practice.
  • Although we did not demonstrate an association between hyperoxia and worse outcome, the small proportion of patients kept within normal ranges limited our power.
  • [MeSH-major] Heart Arrest / therapy. Intensive Care Units, Pediatric / statistics & numerical data. Resuscitation / methods

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  • (PMID = 23552509.001).
  • [ISSN] 1530-0293
  • [Journal-full-title] Critical care medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Crit. Care Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NICHD NIH HHS / HD / HD044955; United States / NICHD NIH HHS / HD / HD050531; United States / NINDS NIH HHS / NS / K23 NS075363; United States / PHS HHS / / U03MC00001; United States / PHS HHS / / U03MC00003; United States / PHS HHS / / U03MC00006; United States / PHS HHS / / U03MC00007; United States / PHS HHS / / U03MC00008
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS475811; NLM/ PMC3683244
  • [Investigator] Kuppermann N; Alpern E; Chamberlain J; Dean J; Gerardi M; Goepp J; Gorelick M; Hoyle J; Jaffe D; Johns C; Levick N; Mahajan P; Maio R; Melville K; Miller S; Monroe D; Ruddy R; Stanley R; Treloar D; Tunik M; Walker A; Kavanaugh D; H Park; Dean M; Holubkov R; Knight S; Clark A; Chamberlain J; Brown M; Corneli H; Goepp J; Holubkov R; Mahajan P; Melville K; Stremski E; Tunik M; Gorelick M; Alpern E; Dean J; Foltin G; Joseph J; Miller S; Moler F; Stanley R; Teach S; Jaffe D; Brown K; Cooper A; Dean J; Johns C; Maio R; Mann N; Monroe D; Shaw K; Teitelbaum D; Treloar D; Stanley R; Alexander D; Brown J; Gerardi M; Gregor M; Holubkov R; Lillis K; Nordberg B; Ruddy R; Shults M; Walker A; Levick N; Brennan J; Brown J; Dean J; Hoyle J; Maio R; Ruddy R; Schalick W; Singh T; Wright J
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34. |......... 9%  Pellot AS, Alessandri JL, Robin S, Sampériz S, Attali T, Brayer C, Pasquet M, Jaffar-Bandjee MC, Benhamou LS, Tiran-Rajaofera I, Ramful D: [Severe forms of chikungunya virus infection in a pediatric intensive care unit on Reunion Island]. Med Trop (Mars); 2012 Mar;72 Spec No:88-93
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  • [Title] [Severe forms of chikungunya virus infection in a pediatric intensive care unit on Reunion Island].
  • [Transliterated title] Infections graves a virus chikungunya en réanimation pédiatrique a l'ile de La Réunion.
  • OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this report is to describe severe forms of chikungunya observed in children hospitalized in a pediatric intensive care unit.
  • Children between 1 month and 15 years admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit with proven chikungunya infection were included.
  • [MeSH-major] Alphavirus Infections / epidemiology. Intensive Care Units, Pediatric / statistics & numerical data

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  • (PMID = 22693937.001).
  • [ISSN] 0025-682X
  • [Journal-full-title] Médecine tropicale : revue du Corps de santé colonial
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med Trop (Mars)
  • [Language] fre
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Chemical-registry-number] Chikungunya virus infection
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35. |......... 9%  Macdonald ME, Liben S, Carnevale FA, Cohen SR: An office or a bedroom? Challenges for family-centered care in the pediatric intensive care unit. J Child Health Care; 2012 Sep;16(3):237-49
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] An office or a bedroom? Challenges for family-centered care in the pediatric intensive care unit.
  • Although the modern pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) has followed general pediatrics and adopted the family-centered care model, little is known about how families prospectively experience PICU care.
  • The authors' goal was to better understand the experiences of families whose child was hospitalized in a PICU.
  • They conducted a 12-month prospective ethnographic study in a PICU in a tertiary care hospital in a large North American urban center.
  • Findings revealed a disconnect between the espoused model of family-centered care and quotidian professional practices.
  • PICU practices and protocols transformed the child into a patient and parents into visitors; issues such as noise, visitation, turf, and privacy could favor staff comfort and convenience over that of the child and family.
  • The authors' discussion highlights suggestions to overcome this divergence in order to truly make the PICU family centered.
  • [MeSH-major] Consumer Satisfaction. Family Nursing. Intensive Care Units, Pediatric

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  • (PMID = 22308544.001).
  • [ISSN] 1741-2889
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of child health care : for professionals working with children in the hospital and community
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Child Health Care
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] Canada / Canadian Institutes of Health Research / /
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
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36. |......... 9%  Moreno RP, Vassallo JC, Sáenz SS, Blanco AC, Allende D, Araguas JL, Ayala Torales S, Banille E, Berrueta AM, Capocasa P, Caprotta CG, Moreno GE, Pérez HS, Porta L, Rodríguez G, Rojo M: [Cardiopulmonary resuscitation in nine pediatric intensive care units of the Argentine Republic]. Arch Argent Pediatr; 2010 Jun;108(3):216-25
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  • [Title] [Cardiopulmonary resuscitation in nine pediatric intensive care units of the Argentine Republic].
  • [Transliterated title] Estudio colaborativo multicéntrico sobre reanimación cardiopulmonar en nueve unidades de cuidados intensivos pediátricos de la República Argentina: A multicentric study.
  • INTRODUCTION: The cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a common setting in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU).
  • OBJECTIVES:. 1) Identify the etiology and epidemiology of the CPR in the PICU.
  • 5) Knowing CPR training of physicians in the PICU.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: All children with cardiopulmonary arrest who were resuscitated in the PICU between 01/04/2004- 31/03/2005.
  • RESULTS: There were 2065 admissions in nine 9 PICU and CPR was conducted in 132 patients (6.39%).
  • All survived were discharged from PICU, but 26 from hospital.
  • In 22 patients there were not evidence of severe neurological damage when discharged home.
  • The chances of recovery were not favorable when CPR was conducted for over sixty minutes or more than six doses of adrenaline were given, without response.
  • CPR in PICU children has a high mortality.
  • PICU physicians were highly trained in CPR with resuscitation courses.
  • [MeSH-major] Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation. Heart Arrest / therapy. Intensive Care Units, Pediatric

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  • (PMID = 20544136.001).
  • [ISSN] 1668-3501
  • [Journal-full-title] Archivos argentinos de pediatría
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Arch Argent Pediatr
  • [Language] spa
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Multicenter Study
  • [Publication-country] Argentina
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37. |......... 9%  Niedner MF, Muething SE, Sutcliffe KM: The high-reliability pediatric intensive care unit. Pediatr Clin North Am; 2013 Jun;60(3):563-80
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  • [Title] The high-reliability pediatric intensive care unit.
  • In health care, reliability is the measurable capability of a process, procedure, or health service to perform its intended function in the required time under actual or existing conditions (as opposed to the ideal circumstances under which they are often studied).
  • This article outlines the current state of reliability in a clinical context, discusses general principles of reliability, and explores the characteristics of high-reliability organizations as a desirable future state for pediatric critical care.
  • [MeSH-major] Intensive Care Units, Pediatric / standards. Quality of Health Care

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  • [Copyright] Published by Elsevier Inc.
  • (PMID = 23639655.001).
  • [ISSN] 1557-8240
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric clinics of North America
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr. Clin. North Am.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
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38. |......... 9%  Schleien CL: The pediatric intensive care unit business model. Pediatr Clin North Am; 2013 Jun;60(3):593-604
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The pediatric intensive care unit business model.
  • All pediatric intensivists need a primer on ICU finance.
  • Differentiating units by size or academic affiliation, the author describes drivers of expense.
  • Some of the other current trends in the ICU business related to changes at the federal and state level as well as in the insurance sector, moving away from fee-for-service are covered.
  • [MeSH-major] Efficiency. Intensive Care Units, Pediatric / economics

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 23639657.001).
  • [ISSN] 1557-8240
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric clinics of North America
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr. Clin. North Am.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
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39. |......... 9%  Bavdekar SB, Sadawarte PA, Gogtay NJ, Jain SS, Jadhav S: Off-label drug use in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit. Indian J Pediatr; 2009 Nov;76(11):1113-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Off-label drug use in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit.
  • OBJECTIVE: To determine the extent and nature of off-label drug use in children admitted to a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) METHODS: This prospective exploratory study was conducted in a tertiary care hospital in a metropolitan city in India after obtaining clearance from the institutional ethics committee.
  • Subjects admitted in PICU from February-August 2006 were enrolled in the study.
  • Fischer's exact test was used to determine if there was significant difference (P<0.05) in off-label use between patients with multiple system affection and those with single system affection and between those requiring artificial ventilatory support and those not requiring it.
  • The proportion of off-label drug use was not influenced by severity of illness, as judged by involvement of multiple systems or need for ventilatory support.
  • Most commonly used drugs in PICU were also the most common off-label drugs.
  • CONCLUSION: Off-label drug use is highly prevalent in PICU settings.
  • [MeSH-major] Intensive Care Units, Pediatric / statistics & numerical data. Off-Label Use / statistics & numerical data

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  • (PMID = 20092023.001).
  • [ISSN] 0973-7693
  • [Journal-full-title] Indian journal of pediatrics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Indian J Pediatr
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] India
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40. |......... 9%  Ognibene KL, Vawdrey DK, Biagas KV: The association of age, illness severity, and glycemic status in a pediatric intensive care unit. Pediatr Crit Care Med; 2011 Nov;12(6):e386-90
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  • [Title] The association of age, illness severity, and glycemic status in a pediatric intensive care unit.
  • SETTING: Thirty-two-bed university-affiliated pediatric intensive care unit.
  • MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: We recorded all blood glucose measurements for up to 10 days of each pediatric intensive care unit visit and assessed rates of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia based on age, medical vs. surgical therapy, length of stay, therapeutic intervention (Therapeutic Intervention Scoring System), and illness severity (Pediatric Risk of Mortality III).
  • Rates of hypoglycemia were not affected by medical/surgical status.
  • Rates of hypo- and hyperglycemia increased with higher Pediatric Risk of Mortality III, Therapeutic Intervention Scoring System, length of stay, and days of mechanical ventilation.
  • [MeSH-major] Blood Glucose / analysis. Intensive Care Units, Pediatric

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  • (PMID = 21478792.001).
  • [ISSN] 1529-7535
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatric critical care medicine : a journal of the Society of Critical Care Medicine and the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatr Crit Care Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Blood Glucose
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41. |......... 9%  Kane JM, Fusilero LS, Joy BF, Wald E: Establishing quality review of cardiac and respiratory arrest in a pediatric intensive care unit. Am J Med Qual; 2012 Nov-Dec;27(6):509-17
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Establishing quality review of cardiac and respiratory arrest in a pediatric intensive care unit.
  • A standardized approach to the review of respiratory and cardiac arrests occurring in the pediatric intensive care unit focusing on processes of care and team performance was undertaken at a single pediatric academic medical center.
  • [MeSH-major] Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation / standards. Heart Arrest / therapy. Intensive Care Units, Pediatric / statistics & numerical data. Respiratory Insufficiency / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Child. Humans. Quality Assurance, Health Care. Quality Improvement. Quality Indicators, Health Care. Quality of Health Care / standards. Quality of Health Care / statistics & numerical data

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  • (PMID = 22544371.001).
  • [ISSN] 1555-824X
  • [Journal-full-title] American journal of medical quality : the official journal of the American College of Medical Quality
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am J Med Qual
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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42. |......... 9%  Coordination Group for National Survey of Development in Pediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care Units: [Development of pediatric and neonatal intensive care units: results of a national survey (2000 - 2009)]. Zhonghua Er Ke Za Zhi; 2011 Sep;49(9):669-74
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Development of pediatric and neonatal intensive care units: results of a national survey (2000 - 2009)].
  • OBJECTIVE: To understand the current situation and development of intensive care units for neonates and children (ICUs) in China.
  • METHODS: A form of survey was e-mailed to chief of each ICU who is one of the thirty five board members of Subspecialty group of Emergency Medicine Chinese Society of Pediatrics or Chinese Society of Emergency Medicine Pediatric Branch.
  • Among them, 25 were children's hospitals (Group A1), 8 were pediatric department of general hospitals (Group B).
  • The total number of ICU beds accounted for 6.9% and 5.8% of total numbers of hospital beds in Group A1 and B respectively, increased 1.1 percent.
  • There were 12 659 and 1392 patients in Group A1 and A2 respectively for whom the Pediatric Critical Illness Scoring system (PCIS) was used to assess the severities of illness in PICU patients.
  • The mean bed occupation rate of PICU in Group A1 and A2 were 127.1% (103.3% - 186.0%) vs. 90.91% (71.0% - 126.0%), NICU in the above Groups were 138.0 (83.8 - 290.5) vs.108.9 (90.7 - 128.0).
  • CONCLUSION: The present study may roughly reflect the development of ICUs in the past ten years and current situation of neonatal and pediatric ICUs in tertiary hospitals in the mainland of China, especially development of PICUs.
  • The percentage of ICU bed to hospital bed was increased.
  • A number of PICU beds were occupied by low risk patients and lack of human resource need to be urgently addressed.
  • [MeSH-major] Intensive Care Units, Neonatal / statistics & numerical data. Intensive Care Units, Neonatal / trends. Intensive Care Units, Pediatric / statistics & numerical data. Intensive Care Units, Pediatric / trends
  • [MeSH-minor] China. Hospitals, Pediatric. Humans. Pediatrics

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  • (PMID = 22176901.001).
  • [ISSN] 0578-1310
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhonghua er ke za zhi. Chinese journal of pediatrics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhonghua Er Ke Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Multicenter Study
  • [Publication-country] China
  • [Investigator] Zhang YM
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43. |......... 9%  Pfleger A, Eber E: Management of acute severe upper airway obstruction in children. Paediatr Respir Rev; 2013 Jun;14(2):70-7
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  • Therefore, providing supportive care and mobilizing resources for definitive airway management may be the most appropriate interventions.
  • [MeSH-major] Airway Obstruction / therapy. Disease Management. Intensive Care Units, Pediatric

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 23598067.001).
  • [ISSN] 1526-0550
  • [Journal-full-title] Paediatric respiratory reviews
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Paediatr Respir Rev
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
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44. |......... 8%  Lipový B, Brychta P, Gregorová N, Jelínková Z, Rihová H, Suchánek I, Kaloudová Y, Mager R, Krupicová H, Martincová A: The epidemiology of pediatric burns undergoing intensive care in Burn Centre Brno, Czech Republic, 1997-2009. Burns; 2012 Aug;38(5):776-82
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The epidemiology of pediatric burns undergoing intensive care in Burn Centre Brno, Czech Republic, 1997-2009.
  • The aim of this study was to determine the basic epidemiological characteristics of severely burned children who were admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU), Department of Burns and Reconstructive Surgery Faculty Hospital Brno, Czech Republic in the years 1997-2009.
  • METHODS: We collected and evaluated epidemiological data such as age, sex, burn etiology, length of hospitalization, duration of the ICU stay, surgical or conservative therapeutic strategies, the use of mechanical ventilation and its duration, day and month of injury and the extent of burned area.
  • RESULTS: In total 383 children (253 boys, 130 girls) aged 0-14 years, underwent intensive care for at least 48h.
  • The average length of stay in ICU was 10.71±10.92 days and total length of hospital stay was an average of 21.55±14.55 days.
  • CONCLUSION: In our report we identify basic epidemiological data defined in the aim of this study for burned children requiring intensive care.
  • [MeSH-major] Burns / epidemiology. Intensive Care Units, Pediatric / statistics & numerical data
  • [MeSH-minor] Accidents, Home / statistics & numerical data. Adolescent. Age Distribution. Burn Units / statistics & numerical data. Child. Child, Preschool. Czech Republic / epidemiology. Female. Humans. Infant. Length of Stay. Male. Risk Factors. Sex Distribution

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 22356816.001).
  • [ISSN] 1879-1409
  • [Journal-full-title] Burns : journal of the International Society for Burn Injuries
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Burns
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
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45. |......... 8%  Lee KJ, Tieves K, Scanlon MC: Alterations in end-of-life support in the pediatric intensive care unit. Pediatrics; 2010 Oct;126(4):e859-64
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  • [Title] Alterations in end-of-life support in the pediatric intensive care unit.
  • Variables collected included end-of-life support category, race, length of stay, operative status, reason for admission, and Pediatric Index of Mortality 2 score, as well as the number of ICU beds and the presence of trainees.
  • The end-of-life support category distribution was as follows: brain death, 296 (23%); do not resuscitate, 205 (16%); limitation of support, 36 (3%); withdrawal of support, 579 (46%); no limitation, 124 (10%); no advance directives, 23 (2%).
  • For further analyses, end-of-life support categories were grouped as limitation (ie, do not resuscitate, limitation of support, or withdrawal of support) versus no limitation (ie, no limitation or no advance directive).
  • Brain death was not included in further analyses.
  • [MeSH-major] Intensive Care Units, Pediatric. Terminal Care
  • [MeSH-minor] Advance Directives. Brain Death. Child. Humans. Life Support Care. Resuscitation Orders. Withholding Treatment

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  • (PMID = 20819890.001).
  • [ISSN] 1098-4275
  • [Journal-full-title] Pediatrics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pediatrics
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Multicenter Study
  • [Publication-country] United States
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46. |......... 8%  Sritippayawan S, Sri-Singh K, Prapphal N, Samransamruajkit R, Deerojanawong J: Multidrug-resistant hospital-associated infections in a pediatric intensive care unit: a cross-sectional survey in a Thai university hospital. Int J Infect Dis; 2009 Jul;13(4):506-12
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Multidrug-resistant hospital-associated infections in a pediatric intensive care unit: a cross-sectional survey in a Thai university hospital.
  • OBJECTIVE: To determine the incidence and associated factors of multidrug-resistant hospital-associated infections (MDR-HAI) in a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) of a university hospital in Thailand.
  • METHOD: A prospective study was performed in the PICU of King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital during the period May-December 2005.
  • Children aged < or = 15 years who developed a PICU-related HAI were studied.
  • RESULTS: Forty-four patients (median age 6 months; male:female = 1.4:1) developed 58 episodes of PICU-related HAI.
  • The following were found more frequently in MDR-HAI when compared to non-MDR-HAI: Acinetobacter baumannii (50% vs. 23%, p = 0.04), female sex (60% vs. 29%, p = 0.02), admission to the PICU with a medical condition (90% vs. 64%, p = 0.03), PICU stay longer than 7 days prior to the development of HAI (67% vs. 36%, p = 0.03), and previous use of broad-spectrum antibiotics (83% vs. 43%, p = 0.002).
  • CONCLUSION: The incidence of MDR-HAI was high in the PICU.
  • [MeSH-major] Cross Infection / epidemiology. Intensive Care Units, Pediatric / statistics & numerical data

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  • (PMID = 19081281.001).
  • [ISSN] 1878-3511
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of infectious diseases : IJID : official publication of the International Society for Infectious Diseases
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int. J. Infect. Dis.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Canada
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Bacterial Agents
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47. |......... 8%  Jensen AM, Lundstrøm KE, Reinholdt J, Lauritsen T, Hansen BM: Paediatric intensive care is feasible in a neonatal department. Dan Med J; 2013 Jan;60(1):A4565
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Paediatric intensive care is feasible in a neonatal department.
  • INTRODUCTION: Intensive care of infants below one year of age has been centralized in a paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) related to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) at Rigshospitalet, the University Hospital in Copenhagen in eastern Denmark (approximately 2.5 million inhabitants) since 2002.
  • The aim of this paper was to evaluate the experiences from the PICU.
  • MATERIAL AND METHODS: A descriptive study including data from the 01.01.2002-31.12.2010-period from all the admissions to the PICU for infants below one year of age fulfilling one of two criteria:.
  • Mortality was evaluated in the three year-period 2008-2010 by use of the Paediatric Index of Mortality 2 score (PIM2 score).
  • RESULTS: The nine-year period saw 927 admissions to the PICU and 355 infants received mechanical ventilation (median three days).
  • CONCLUSION: The experience from the NICU seems to -compensate for a low volume of infants in the PICU.
  • FUNDING: Not relevant.
  • TRIAL REGISTRATION: Not relevant.
  • The study was not registered, as it is an observational study.
  • [MeSH-major] Intensive Care Units, Pediatric / statistics & numerical data. Premature Birth / therapy. Respiration, Artificial / statistics & numerical data. Respiratory Insufficiency / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Denmark. Gestational Age. Hospital Mortality. Humans. Infant. Intensive Care Units, Neonatal / organization & administration. Intensive Care Units, Neonatal / statistics & numerical data. Odds Ratio. Time Factors

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  • (PMID = 23340189.001).
  • [ISSN] 2245-1919
  • [Journal-full-title] Danish medical journal
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Dan Med J
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Denmark
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48. |......... 8%  Gurskis V, Asembergiene J, Kevalas R, Miciuleviciene J, Pavilonis A, Valinteliene R, Dagys A: Reduction of nosocomial infections and mortality attributable to nosocomial infections in pediatric intensive care units in Lithuania. Medicina (Kaunas); 2009;45(3):203-13
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  • [Title] Reduction of nosocomial infections and mortality attributable to nosocomial infections in pediatric intensive care units in Lithuania.
  • Data were collected from January 2005 until December 2007 in three pediatric intensive care units.
  • All patients aged between 1 month and 18 years hospitalized in units for more than 48 hours were included in the study.
  • [MeSH-major] Cross Infection / prevention & control. Infection Control / methods. Intensive Care Units, Pediatric

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  • (PMID = 19357450.001).
  • [ISSN] 1648-9144
  • [Journal-full-title] Medicina (Kaunas, Lithuania)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Medicina (Kaunas)
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Evaluation Studies; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Lithuania
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49. |......... 8%  Rosman EC, Blaufox AD, Menco A, Trope R, Seiden HS: What are we missing? Arrhythmia detection in the pediatric intensive care unit. J Pediatr; 2013 Aug;163(2):511-4
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] What are we missing? Arrhythmia detection in the pediatric intensive care unit.
  • OBJECTIVES: To test the hypothesis that instituting a process of routine daily review of rhythm alarms in non-cardiac patients in the pediatric intensive care unit would yield clinically important disturbances that would otherwise go undetected.
  • Two patients' care were altered as a result of detection of the arrhythmia in the review process.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Daily review of rhythm alarms improves detection of clinically relevant arrhythmias in non-cardiac pediatric intensive care unit patients.
  • [MeSH-major] Arrhythmias, Cardiac / diagnosis. Intensive Care Units, Pediatric

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 23453551.001).
  • [ISSN] 1097-6833
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of pediatrics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Pediatr.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; CCMC / Cohen Children's Medical Center / ECG / Electrocardiograph / HR / Heart rate / ICU / Intensive care unit / PICU / PVC / Pediatric intensive care unit / Premature ventricular contraction / VT / Ventricular tachycardia
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50. |......... 8%  Heward Y: Advanced practice in paediatric intensive care: a review. Paediatr Nurs; 2009 Feb;21(1):18-21
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Advanced practice in paediatric intensive care: a review.
  • Advanced nursing roles are one way of encouraging experienced nurses to stay in clinical practice so they can provide expert care, develop practice and be role models for junior staff.
  • A search for literature about advanced nurse practice in paediatric intensive care units in the UK identified just four articles, including one survey, but no reports of empirical research.
  • Although several UK units have developed or are developing the role, more insight and better evidence is needed on how nursing can be advanced in paediatric intensive care settings.
  • [MeSH-major] Intensive Care Units, Pediatric. Nurse Practitioners
  • [MeSH-minor] Clinical Competence. Education, Nursing, Graduate. Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

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  • (PMID = 19266777.001).
  • [ISSN] 0962-9513
  • [Journal-full-title] Paediatric nursing
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Paediatr Nurs
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Number-of-references] 28
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