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1. Biomedical articles (top 50; 2010 to 2015)
1. Chinn L, Hertel J: Rehabilitation of ankle and foot injuries in athletes. Clin Sports Med; 2010 Jan;29(1):157-67, table of contents
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Rehabilitation of ankle and foot injuries in athletes.
  • Foot and ankle injuries are extremely common among athletes and other physically active individuals.
  • Rehabilitation programs that emphasize the use of therapeutic exercise to restore joint range of motion, muscle strength, neuromuscular coordination, and gait mechanics have been shown to have clinical success for patients suffering various foot and ankle pathologies.
  • Rehabilitation programs are discussed for ankle sprains, plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendonitis, and turf toe.
  • [MeSH-major] Ankle Injuries / rehabilitation. Athletic Injuries / rehabilitation. Foot Injuries / rehabilitation

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  • [Cites] Rheumatology (Oxford). 2008 Oct;47(10):1493-7 [18647799.001]
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  • (PMID = 19945591.001).
  • [ISSN] 1556-228X
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinics in sports medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Sports Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCCAM NIH HHS / AT / 1R21AT004195; United States / NCCAM NIH HHS / AT / R21 AT004195; United States / NCCAM NIH HHS / AT / R21 AT004195-01A2
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS145158; NLM/ PMC2786815
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2. Herscovici D Jr, Scaduto JM: Management of high-energy foot and ankle injuries in the geriatric population. Geriatr Orthop Surg Rehabil; 2012 Mar;3(1):33-44
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Management of high-energy foot and ankle injuries in the geriatric population.
  • From January 1989 through December 2010, a total of 494 elderly patients with 536 foot and ankle injuries were identified.
  • Within this group, 237 (48%) patients with 294 injuries were sustained as a result of a high-energy mechanism.
  • These mechanisms consisted of 170 motor vehicle accidents, 30 as a result of high (not ground level) energy falls, 2 from industrial accidents, and 35 classified as other, which included sports, blunt trauma, bicycle, airplane or boating accidents, crush injuries, and injuries resulting from a lawn mower.
  • The injuries produced were 17 metatarsal fractures, 9 Lisfranc injuries, 10 midfoot (navicular, cuneiform, or cuboid) fractures, 23 talus fractures, 63 calcaneal fractures, 73 unimalleolar, bimalleolar, or trimalleolar ankle fractures, 45 pilon fractures, and 3 pure dislocations of the foot or ankle.
  • Overall, 243 (83%) of these injuries underwent surgical fixation and data have shown that when surgery is used to manage high-energy injuries of the foot and ankle in the elderly individuals, the complications and outcomes are similar to those seen in younger patients.
  • Therefore, the decision for surgical intervention for high-energy injuries of the foot and ankle should be based primarily on the injury pattern and not solely on the age of the patient.

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  • (PMID = 23569695.001).
  • [ISSN] 2151-4585
  • [Journal-full-title] Geriatric orthopaedic surgery & rehabilitation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Geriatr Orthop Surg Rehabil
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3617904
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; elderly / foot and ankle / geriatric / high-energy injuries
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3. De Boer AS, Schepers T, Panneman MJ, Van Beeck EF, Van Lieshout EM: Health care consumption and costs due to foot and ankle injuries in the Netherlands, 1986-2010. BMC Musculoskelet Disord; 2014;15:128
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Health care consumption and costs due to foot and ankle injuries in the Netherlands, 1986-2010.
  • BACKGROUND: Foot and ankle injuries account for a large proportion of Emergency Department attendance.
  • The aim of this study was to assess population-based trends in attendances due to foot and ankle injuries in the Netherlands since 1986, and to provide a detailed analysis of health care costs in these patients.
  • Injury cases and hospital length of stay were extracted from the National Injury Surveillance System (non-hospitalized patients) and the National Medical Registration (hospitalized patients).
  • Data were grouped into osseous and ligamentous injuries for foot and ankle separately.
  • In non-admitted patients (90% of cases), ligamentous injuries approximately halved, whereas osseous injuries increased by 28% (foot) and 25% (ankle).
  • The incidence rate for hospital admission increased by 35%, mainly due to an almost doubling of osseous injuries.
  • Hospital length of stay (HLOS) increased with age and was highest for osseous injuries.
  • HLOS was unaffected by gender, apart for longer stay in elderly females with an osseous ankle injury.
  • Health care costs per case were highest for osseous injuries of the ankle (€ 3,461).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Since 1986, the emergency attendance rate of foot and ankle injuries in the Netherlands decreased by 25%.
  • Throughout the years, the attendance rate of (relatively simple) ligamentous injuries strongly reduced, whereas osseous injuries nearly doubled.
  • [MeSH-major] Ankle Injuries / economics. Ankle Injuries / therapy. Foot Injuries / economics. Foot Injuries / therapy. Health Care Costs. Health Resources / economics


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4. Terrier P, Luthi F, Dériaz O: Do orthopaedic shoes improve local dynamic stability of gait? An observational study in patients with chronic foot and ankle injuries. BMC Musculoskelet Disord; 2013;14:94
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Do orthopaedic shoes improve local dynamic stability of gait? An observational study in patients with chronic foot and ankle injuries.
  • BACKGROUND: Complex foot and ankle fractures, such as calcaneum fractures or Lisfranc dislocations, are often associated with a poor outcome, especially in terms of gait capacity.
  • The aim of this study was to analyze changes in LDS induced by orthopaedic shoes in patients with persistent foot and ankle injuries.
  • They were treated for chronic post-traumatic disabilities following ankle and/or foot fractures in a Swiss rehabilitation clinic.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Footwear adaptation led to pain relief and to improved foot & ankle proprioception.
  • It is likely that that enhancement allows patients to better control foot placement.
  • [MeSH-major] Ankle Injuries / rehabilitation. Foot Injuries / rehabilitation. Foot Orthoses. Fractures, Bone / rehabilitation. Gait. Shoes

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  • (PMID = 23496924.001).
  • [ISSN] 1471-2474
  • [Journal-full-title] BMC musculoskeletal disorders
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BMC Musculoskelet Disord
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3608952
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5. Probst C, Richter M, Lefering R, Frink M, Gaulke R, Krettek C, Hildebrand F: Incidence and significance of injuries to the foot and ankle in polytrauma patients--an analysis of the Trauma Registry of DGU. Injury; 2010 Feb;41(2):210-5
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Incidence and significance of injuries to the foot and ankle in polytrauma patients--an analysis of the Trauma Registry of DGU.
  • BACKGROUND: Injuries to the foot and ankle are often missed or underestimated during the initial care for polytraumatized patients.
  • Nonetheless, injuries to the lower extremity exert significant influence on long-term outcome after discharge from the acute care facility.
  • Since the mortality of trauma decreased in the last decades, these injuries gain more effect on the overall outcome.
  • We analysed foot and ankle injury patterns, associated procedures and special characteristics of this population during early care.
  • METHODS: Multiply injured patients of the Trauma Registry of DGU (TR-DGU; Injury Severity Score, ISS > or = 16) with injuries to the foot and ankle (group F&A) were compared to the remaining TR-DGU population (group Non-F&A) for differences in injury characteristics, surgical treatment and early outcome.
  • RESULTS: Demographic data and injury severity were comparable between the groups.
  • The group F&A showed significantly more falls from a height above 3m and suicidal injuries.
  • Their overall injury severity to the extremities, especially to the regions different from the foot and ankle, was significantly higher compared to group Non-F&A.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Our data enhance the need for a meticulous search for injuries to the foot and ankle in patients with falls, comparably light injuries to the trunk and head and especially in patients with multiple and severe injuries to the skeletal system.
  • Since 88.4% of patients with foot and ankle injuries are discharged alive, early appropriate care should be given to these injuries that significantly affect long-term outcome.
  • [MeSH-major] Ankle Injuries / epidemiology. Foot Injuries / epidemiology. Multiple Trauma / epidemiology. Registries / statistics & numerical data
  • [MeSH-minor] Abbreviated Injury Scale. Accidental Falls / statistics & numerical data. Accidents, Traffic / statistics & numerical data. Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Female. Germany / epidemiology. Glasgow Outcome Scale. Humans. Injury Severity Score. Male. Middle Aged. Outcome Assessment (Health Care). Suicide, Attempted / statistics & numerical data. Young Adult


6. Cooper IF, Siadaty MS: 'Injuries or Poisonings' associated with 'Post Traumatic Pain': Top Publications. BioMedLib Review; InjuryOrPoisoning;PostTraumaticPain:706030257. ISSN: 2331-5717. 2014/11/20
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  • [Title] 'Injuries or Poisonings' associated with 'Post Traumatic Pain': Top Publications.
  • [Transliterated title]
  • Background: There are articles published each month which present 'Injury or Poisoning' for 'post traumatic pain'.
  • Finding such articles is important for researchers, clinicians, and patients.
  • However these articles are spread across thousands of journals, and there are many types of 'Injury or Poisoning'.
  • This makes searching and locating the relevant publications a challenge.
  • We have used BioMedLib's semantic search technology to address the issue, and gathered all the pertinent publications in this review article.
  • Methods: We categorized the publications we found into two groups.
  • We used the strength of textual-association to separate the groups.
  • In group one there are publications with the strongest evidence of association. We focused finding the most relevant publications pertinent to our goal, rather than combining them into a conclusion section. Such textual synthesis will be the focus of our next project.
  • Results: Group one includes 12 publications, and group two 2330 publications.
  • Here are the top 7.
  • Lundeen RO: Arthroscopic evaluation of traumatic injuries to the ankle and foot. Part II: Chronic posttraumatic pain.
  • Nebel K et al: Prospective PC-interactive pressure algesimetry of post-traumatic neck pain after whiplash injury.
  • Slepian P et al: Changes in pain catastrophizing following physical therapy for musculoskeletal injury: the influence of depressive and post-traumatic stress symptoms.
  • Sullivan MJ et al: Pain, perceived injustice and the persistence of post-traumatic stress symptoms during the course of rehabilitation for whiplash injuries.
  • Elias LA et al: PainDETECT: a suitable screening tool for neuropathic pain in patients with painful post-traumatic trigeminal nerve injuries?.
  • Smith-Seemiller L et al: Presence of post-concussion syndrome symptoms in patients with chronic pain vs mild traumatic brain injury.
  • Ullrich PM et al: Pain and post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms during inpatient rehabilitation among operation enduring freedom/operation iraqi freedom veterans with spinal cord injury.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2014 Siadaty and Cooper; licensee BioMedLib LLC.
  • (UID = 706030257.001).
  • [ISSN] 2331-5717
  • [Journal-full-title] BioMedLib Review
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Review
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
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7. Cooper IF, Siadaty MS: 'Daily or Recreational Activities' associated with 'Ankle And Foot': Top Publications. BioMedLib Review; DailyOrRecreational;AnkleAndFoot:706390914. ISSN: 2331-5717. 2014/3/26
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  • [Title] 'Daily or Recreational Activities' associated with 'Ankle And Foot': Top Publications.
  • [Transliterated title]
  • Background: There are articles published each month which present 'Daily or Recreational Activity' for 'ankle and foot'.
  • Finding such articles is important for researchers, clinicians, and patients.
  • However these articles are spread across thousands of journals, and there are many types of 'Daily or Recreational Activity'.
  • This makes searching and locating the relevant publications a challenge.
  • We have used BioMedLib's semantic search technology to address the issue, and gathered all the pertinent publications in this review article.
  • Methods: We categorized the publications we found into two groups.
  • We used the strength of textual-association to separate the groups.
  • In group one there are publications with the strongest evidence of association. We focused finding the most relevant publications pertinent to our goal, rather than combining them into a conclusion section. Such textual synthesis will be the focus of our next project.
  • Results: Group one includes 21 publications, and group two 7041 publications.
  • Here are the top 10.
  • van Swigchem R et al: Is transcutaneous peroneal stimulation beneficial to patients with chronic stroke using an ankle-foot orthosis? A within-subjects study of patients' satisfaction, walking speed and physical activity level.
  • Badekas T et al: Foot and ankle injuries during the Athens 2004 Olympic Games.
  • Armenis E et al: Osteoarthritis of the ankle and foot complex in former Greek soccer players.
  • Russell JA et al: Ankle and foot contributions to extreme plantar- and dorsiflexion in female ballet dancers.
  • Li JX et al: Proprioception of foot and ankle complex in young regular practitioners of ice hockey, ballet dancing and running.
  • Dunfee WR et al: Imaging of athletic injuries to the ankle and foot.
  • Giza E et al: Mechanisms of foot and ankle injuries in soccer.
  • O'Reilly T et al: Effects of ankle-foot orthoses for children with hemiplegia on weight-bearing and functional ability.
  • Hillier JC et al: Pictorial review: MRI features of foot and ankle injuries in ballet dancers.
  • Baravarian B: Preface: athletic injuries of the foot and ankle.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2014 Siadaty and Cooper; licensee BioMedLib LLC.
  • (UID = 706390914.001).
  • [ISSN] 2331-5717
  • [Journal-full-title] BioMedLib Review
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Review
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
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8. Luciano Ade P, Lara LC: Epidemiological study of foot and ankle injuries in recreational sports. Acta Ortop Bras; 2012 Dec;20(6):339-42
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Epidemiological study of foot and ankle injuries in recreational sports.
  • OBJECTIVE: This is a retrospective study showing the incidence, type and extent of injuries occurring in the foot and/or ankle as a result of recreational sports practice.
  • METHODS: We treated 131 patients, of which 123 were male and 8 female, with a history of trauma and pain in the foot and/or ankle after the practicing recreational sports.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The sprained ankle was the most frequent type of injury, especially those of grade I and II.
  • Soccer was the sport responsible for the highest incidence of injuries and among its various forms the indoor soccer presented the highest frequency of injuries (35%).

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  • (PMID = 24453628.001).
  • [ISSN] 1413-7852
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta ortopedica brasileira
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Ortop Bras
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Brazil
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3861959
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Ankle injuries / Foot injuries / Sports / Wounds and injuries
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9. Masini BD, Murray CK, Wenke JC, Hsu JR: Prevention and treatment of infected foot and ankle wounds sustained in the combat environment. Foot Ankle Clin; 2010 Mar;15(1):91-112
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Prevention and treatment of infected foot and ankle wounds sustained in the combat environment.
  • Combat injuries to the foot and ankle are challenging to treat due to frequent high-energy mechanisms, environmental contamination, and soft tissue and bony damage.
  • Prevention and treatment of infections in injuries to the foot and ankle are critical to achieving the goals of tissue healing and restoration of function.
  • The guidelines for treatment of these foot and ankle injuries are similar to those in place for civilians; however, allowances must be made for the realities of combat including an often austere environment, the need for evacuation, and limitations on resources available for treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Leg Injuries / surgery. Surgical Wound Infection / therapy. War. Wound Infection / prevention & control. Wound Infection / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Ankle Injuries / complications. Ankle Injuries / surgery. Anti-Bacterial Agents / therapeutic use. Combined Modality Therapy. Debridement / methods. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Foot Injuries / complications. Foot Injuries / surgery. Fractures, Open / complications. Fractures, Open / surgery. Humans. Male. Military Medicine / standards. Military Medicine / trends. Reconstructive Surgical Procedures / methods. Risk Assessment. Soft Tissue Injuries / complications. Soft Tissue Injuries / surgery. Treatment Outcome. Wound Healing / physiology

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.
  • (PMID = 20189119.001).
  • [ISSN] 1558-1934
  • [Journal-full-title] Foot and ankle clinics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Foot Ankle Clin
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Bacterial Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 135
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10. Caswell F, Brown C: Identifying foot fractures and dislocations. Emerg Nurse; 2014 Oct;22(6):30-4
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Identifying foot fractures and dislocations.
  • As the roles of emergency nurse practitioners expand, more patients with minor injuries are being managed independently by nursing staff.
  • Injuries to the foot and ankle are common among such patients, and X-rays are frequently performed to aid their diagnoses.
  • This article describes some of these injuries and offers advice, including X-ray illustrations, on how to identify them.

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  • (PMID = 25270819.001).
  • [ISSN] 1354-5752
  • [Journal-full-title] Emergency nurse : the journal of the RCN Accident and Emergency Nursing Association
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Emerg Nurse
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Lisfranc injury / X-ray / fracture / subtalar dislocation
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11. Kaplan LD, Jost PW, Honkamp N, Norwig J, West R, Bradley JP: Incidence and variance of foot and ankle injuries in elite college football players. Am J Orthop (Belle Mead NJ); 2011 Jan;40(1):40-4
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Incidence and variance of foot and ankle injuries in elite college football players.
  • We conducted a study on the risk for foot and ankle injuries in college football players on the basis of injury type and player position.
  • All pathologic conditions and surgical procedures of the foot and ankle were recorded, and data were analyzed by player position to detect any trends.
  • Seventy-two percent (n = 231) of the players had a history of foot and ankle injuries, with a total of 287 foot and ankle injuries (1.24 injuries/player injured).
  • The most common injuries were lateral ankle sprain (n = 115), syndesmotic sprain (50), metatarsophalangeal dislocation/turf toe (36), and fibular fracture (25).
  • Foot and ankle injuries were most common in kickers/punters (100% incidence), special teams (100%), running backs (83%), wide receivers (83%), and offensive linemen (80%).
  • Lateral ankle sprains, the most common injuries, were treated surgically only 2.6% of the time.
  • Foot and ankle injuries are common in collegiate football players, affecting 72% of players.
  • Trends are seen in the types of injuries for the different player positions.
  • [MeSH-major] Ankle Injuries / epidemiology. Athletic Injuries / epidemiology. Foot Injuries / epidemiology. Football


12. Wallace RF, Wahi MM, Hill OT, Kay AB: Rates of ankle and foot injuries in active-duty U.S. Army soldiers, 2000-2006. Mil Med; 2011 Mar;176(3):283-90
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Rates of ankle and foot injuries in active-duty U.S. Army soldiers, 2000-2006.
  • Ankle and foot injuries (AFI) are a major cause of Active-Duty Army (ADA) soldiers' time lost from training and combat operations.
  • We used the Total Army Injury and Health Outcomes Database to compute the rates of AFI to identify high-risk ADA groups for the years 2000-2006.
  • Yearly, 60% to 70% of ADA soldiers with AFI had an ankle sprain/strain, and ankle sprain/strain had the highest 7-year rate of all AFIs (103 per 1,000).
  • [MeSH-major] Ankle Injuries / epidemiology. Foot Injuries / epidemiology. Military Personnel / statistics & numerical data


13. Othman MI, Chew KM, Peh WC: Variants and pitfalls in MR imaging of foot and ankle injuries. Semin Musculoskelet Radiol; 2014 Feb;18(1):54-62
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Variants and pitfalls in MR imaging of foot and ankle injuries.
  • Foot and ankle injuries are very common, particularly among young active athletic individuals.
  • MR imaging has become one of the modalities of choice in the assessment of foot and ankle injuries.
  • This article describes the common anatomical variants and technical pitfalls in MR imaging of the foot and ankle.
  • [MeSH-major] Ankle Injuries / diagnosis. Ankle Joint / pathology. Diagnostic Errors / prevention & control. Foot / pathology. Foot Injuries / diagnosis. Magnetic Resonance Imaging / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Ankle / abnormalities. Ankle / pathology. Diagnosis, Differential. Foot Deformities, Congenital / diagnosis. Humans


14. Burns P, Highlander P, Shinabarger AB: Management in high-risk patients. Clin Podiatr Med Surg; 2014 Oct;31(4):523-38
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • Injuries to the foot and ankle are often missed or underestimated in patients with polytrauma and are a source of long-term limitations.
  • As mortalities decrease for patients with polytrauma a greater emphasis on timely diagnosis and treatment of foot and ankle injuries is indicated.
  • This article discusses perioperative management and complications associated with foot and ankle injuries in polytrauma, and in diabetic and geriatric patients.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 25281513.001).
  • [ISSN] 1558-2302
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinics in podiatric medicine and surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Podiatr Med Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Charcot / Diabetes / Elderly / Fracture / Neuropathy / Osteoporotic / Polytrauma
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15. Cooper IF, Siadaty MS: 'Body PartsCMMA OrgansCMMA or Organ Components' associated with 'Post Traumatic Pain': Top Publications. BioMedLib Review; BodyPartOrgan;PostTraumaticPain:706029337. ISSN: 2331-5717. 2014/1/20
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  • [Title] 'Body PartsCMMA OrgansCMMA or Organ Components' associated with 'Post Traumatic Pain': Top Publications.
  • [Transliterated title]
  • Background: There are articles published each month which present 'Body Part Organ or Organ Component' for 'post traumatic pain'.
  • Finding such articles is important for researchers, clinicians, and patients.
  • However these articles are spread across thousands of journals, and there are many types of 'Body Part Organ or Organ Component'.
  • This makes searching and locating the relevant publications a challenge.
  • We have used BioMedLib's semantic search technology to address the issue, and gathered all the pertinent publications in this review article.
  • Methods: We categorized the publications we found into two groups.
  • We used the strength of textual-association to separate the groups.
  • In group one there are publications with the strongest evidence of association. We focused finding the most relevant publications pertinent to our goal, rather than combining them into a conclusion section. Such textual synthesis will be the focus of our next project.
  • Results: Group one includes 12 publications, and group two 2988 publications.
  • Here are the top 7.
  • Stevanato G et al: Chronic post-traumatic neuropathic pain of brachial plexus and upper limb: a new technique of peripheral nerve stimulation.
  • Lundeen RO: Arthroscopic evaluation of traumatic injuries to the ankle and foot. Part II: Chronic posttraumatic pain.
  • Freising S: [Post-traumatic pain in the lower leg and foot caused by irritation of the tibial nerve].
  • Geisl H et al: [The rupture of the articular disc as a reason for posttraumatic pain in the wrist joint (author's transl)].
  • Grosse A et al: MRI findings of prolonged post-traumatic sternal pain.
  • Carvalho GA et al: [Pain management after post-traumatic brachial plexus lesions. Conservative and surgical therapy possibilities].
  • Bertoli E et al: Prevalence and impact of post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms in patients with masticatory muscle or temporomandibular joint pain: differences and similarities.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2014 Siadaty and Cooper; licensee BioMedLib LLC.
  • (UID = 706029337.001).
  • [ISSN] 2331-5717
  • [Journal-full-title] BioMedLib Review
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Review
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
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16. Cooper IF, Siadaty MS: 'Signs or Symptoms' associated with 'Traumatic Injury Disorder': Top Publications. BioMedLib Review; SignOrSymptom;TraumaticInjuryDisorder:705433908. ISSN: 2331-5717. 2014/4/26
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  • [Title] 'Signs or Symptoms' associated with 'Traumatic Injury Disorder': Top Publications.
  • [Transliterated title]
  • Background: There are articles published each month which present 'sign or symptom' for 'traumatic injury disorder'.
  • Finding such articles is important for researchers, clinicians, and patients.
  • However these articles are spread across thousands of journals, and there are many types of 'sign or symptom'.
  • This makes searching and locating the relevant publications a challenge.
  • We have used BioMedLib's semantic search technology to address the issue, and gathered all the pertinent publications in this review article.
  • Methods: We categorized the publications we found into two groups.
  • We used the strength of textual-association to separate the groups.
  • In group one there are publications with the strongest evidence of association. We focused finding the most relevant publications pertinent to our goal, rather than combining them into a conclusion section. Such textual synthesis will be the focus of our next project.
  • Results: Group one includes 28 publications, and group two 234559 publications.
  • Here are the top 10.
  • Aydin MA et al: A standardized education protocol significantly reduces traumatic injuries and syncope recurrence: an observational study in 316 patients with vasovagal syncope.
  • Auer J: Syncope and trauma. Are syncope-related traumatic injuries the key to find the specific cause of the symptom?.
  • Rodrigues RN et al: [Excessive daytime sleepiness after traumatic brain injury: association with periodic limb movements and REM behavior disorder: case report].
  • Huckans M et al: A pilot study examining effects of group-based Cognitive Strategy Training treatment on self-reported cognitive problems, psychiatric symptoms, functioning, and compensatory strategy use in OIF/OEF combat veterans with persistent mild cognitive disorder and history of traumatic brain injury.
  • Palmer SC: Acute stress disorder is of limited benefit in predicting post-traumatic stress disorder in people surviving traumatic injury.
  • Ammirati F et al: Prevalence and correlates of syncope-related traumatic injuries in tilt-induced vasovagal syncope.
  • Schuchert A et al: Effect of syncope-related traumatic injuries on the diagnostic evaluation and syncope recurrence of patients with syncope and apparently normal hearts.
  • Lundeen RO: Arthroscopic evaluation of traumatic injuries to the ankle and foot. Part II: Chronic posttraumatic pain.
  • O'Toole RV et al: Resuscitation before stabilization of femoral fractures limits acute respiratory distress syndrome in patients with multiple traumatic injuries despite low use of damage control orthopedics.
  • : Cell Therapeutics Inc. reports novel therapy for acute respiratory distress syndrome--the largest cause of mortality in patients with multiple traumatic injuries.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2014 Siadaty and Cooper; licensee BioMedLib LLC.
  • (UID = 705433908.001).
  • [ISSN] 2331-5717
  • [Journal-full-title] BioMedLib Review
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Review
  • [Publication-country] UNITED STATES
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17. Hunt KJ, Githens M, Riley GM, Kim M, Gold GE: Foot and ankle injuries in sport: imaging correlation with arthroscopic and surgical findings. Clin Sports Med; 2013 Jul;32(3):525-57
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Foot and ankle injuries in sport: imaging correlation with arthroscopic and surgical findings.
  • Foot and ankle injuries are common in sport.
  • Although many available imaging techniques can be useful in identifying and classifying injuries, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides high levels of sensitivity and specificity for articular and soft-tissue injuries.
  • Arthroscopic and minimally invasive treatment techniques for foot and ankle injuries are rapidly evolving, minimizing morbidity and improving postoperative rehabilitation and return to play.
  • [MeSH-major] Ankle Injuries / diagnosis. Arthroscopy. Athletic Injuries / diagnosis. Foot Injuries / diagnosis. Magnetic Resonance Imaging
  • [MeSH-minor] Ankle Joint / anatomy & histology. Cysts / diagnosis. Cysts / surgery. Foot / anatomy & histology. Humans. Joint Loose Bodies / diagnosis. Lateral Ligament, Ankle / injuries. Metatarsophalangeal Joint / anatomy & histology. Metatarsophalangeal Joint / injuries. Subtalar Joint / injuries. Synovitis / diagnosis. Tendon Injuries / diagnosis. Tendon Injuries / surgery


18. Anderson RB, Hunt KJ, McCormick JJ: Management of common sports-related injuries about the foot and ankle. J Am Acad Orthop Surg; 2010 Sep;18(9):546-56
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Management of common sports-related injuries about the foot and ankle.
  • Foot and ankle injuries are commonplace in competitive sports.
  • Improvements in injury surveillance programs and injury reporting have enabled physicians to better recognize and manage specific foot and ankle injuries, with a primary goal of efficient and safe return to play.
  • Athletes are becoming stronger, faster, and better conditioned, and higher-energy injuries are becoming increasingly common.
  • Close attention is required during examination to accurately identify such injuries as turf toe, ankle injuries, tarsometatarsal (ie, Lisfranc) injuries, and stress fractures.
  • Early diagnosis and management of these injuries are critical.
  • [MeSH-major] Ankle Injuries / therapy. Athletic Injuries / therapy. Foot Injuries / therapy


19. Khan W, Oragui E, Akagha E: Common fractures and injuries of the ankle and foot: functional anatomy, imaging, classification and management. J Perioper Pract; 2010 Jul;20(7):249-58
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Common fractures and injuries of the ankle and foot: functional anatomy, imaging, classification and management.
  • The ankle and foot are functionally important and complex joints.
  • Bony fractures and ligamentous injuries are common.
  • In this review paper we will discuss the functional anatomy, imaging, classification and the management of common ankle and foot injuries including ankle fractures, Achilles tendon ruptures, Lisfranc joint injuries, calcaneo fractures and fractures of the metatarsals and phalanges.
  • [MeSH-major] Ankle Injuries. Foot Injuries. Fractures, Bone


20. Soomekh DJ: New technology and techniques in the treatment of foot and ankle injuries. Clin Podiatr Med Surg; 2011 Jan;28(1):19-41
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] New technology and techniques in the treatment of foot and ankle injuries.
  • The advancement of new technologies in the treatment of foot and ankle injuries seems exponential over the last several years.
  • Foot and ankle injuries are commonplace in competitive sports.
  • This article provides an overview of the diagnosis and treatment, including surgical techniques, of common foot and ankle injuries.
  • [MeSH-major] Ankle Injuries / diagnosis. Ankle Injuries / therapy. Foot Injuries / diagnosis. Foot Injuries / therapy. Orthopedic Procedures / trends
  • [MeSH-minor] Diagnostic Imaging / methods. Female. Forecasting. Humans. Injury Severity Score. Male. Recovery of Function. Risk Factors. Treatment Outcome

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 21276516.001).
  • [ISSN] 1558-2302
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinics in podiatric medicine and surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Podiatr Med Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
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21. Hay-David AG, Clint SA, Brown RR, Gloucestershire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust: The impact of the Major Trauma Network: will trauma units continue to treat complex foot and ankle injuries? Injury; 2014 Dec;45(12):2005-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The impact of the Major Trauma Network: will trauma units continue to treat complex foot and ankle injuries?
  • Our premise was that trauma units (level 2) would no longer manage complex foot and ankle injuries thereby obviating the need for a foot and ankle specialist service.
  • METHODS: Retrospective analysis of the epidemiology of foot and ankle injuries, using the Gloucestershire trauma database, from a trauma unit with a population of 750,000.
  • Rates of open fractures, complex foot and ankle injuries and requirement for stabilisation with external fixation were reviewed before and after the introduction of the regional Trauma Network.
  • Secondly, using the Trauma Audit & Research Network (TARN) database, all foot and ankle injuries triaged to the regional Major Trauma Centre (MTC) were reviewed.
  • RESULTS: Incidence of open foot and ankle injuries was 2.9 per 100,000 per year.
  • There were 5.1% open injuries before the network and 3.2% after (p>0.05).
  • Frequency of complex foot and ankle injuries was 4.2% before and 7.5% after the network commenced, showing no significant change.
  • There was no statistically significant change in the numbers of patients with complex foot and ankle injuries treated by application of external fixators.
  • Analysis of TARN data revealed that only 18% of patients with foot and ankle injuries taken to the MTC had an ISS≥16.
  • Only 4.5% of patients had isolated, closed foot and ankle injuries.
  • CONCLUSION: We found that at the trauma unit there was no decrease in the numbers of complex foot and ankle injuries, open fractures, or the applications of external fixators, following the introduction of the Trauma Network.
  • Our findings suggest that there is still a need for foot and ankle specialists at trauma units, in order to manage patients with complex foot and ankle injuries.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 25245665.001).
  • [ISSN] 1879-0267
  • [Journal-full-title] Injury
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Injury
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Complex foot and ankle injuries / Major Trauma Centre / Trauma unit
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22. Owens JG: Physical therapy of the patient with foot and ankle injuries sustained in combat. Foot Ankle Clin; 2010 Mar;15(1):175-86
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Physical therapy of the patient with foot and ankle injuries sustained in combat.
  • Polytrauma from high-energy blasts are common and frequently associated with mangled extremities, axial fractures, and traumatic brain injuries.
  • This article highlights the challenges encountered and techniques used in the rehabilitation of soldiers with foot and ankle injuries sustained in recent combat operations.
  • [MeSH-major] Ankle Injuries / rehabilitation. Blast Injuries / rehabilitation. Foot Injuries / rehabilitation. Physical Therapy Modalities. War
  • [MeSH-minor] Afghan Campaign 2001-. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Injury Severity Score. Iraq War, 2003-2011. Male. Muscle Strength / physiology. Range of Motion, Articular / physiology. Recovery of Function. Treatment Outcome

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  • [Copyright] Published by Elsevier Inc.
  • (PMID = 20189123.001).
  • [ISSN] 1558-1934
  • [Journal-full-title] Foot and ankle clinics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Foot Ankle Clin
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 26
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23. Yu G, Zhao H: [Progress and main points in treatment of acute foot and ankle injuries]. Zhongguo Xiu Fu Chong Jian Wai Ke Za Zhi; 2011 Jul;25(7):769-73
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] [Progress and main points in treatment of acute foot and ankle injuries].
  • OBJECTIVE: To give a review and commentary on the treatment of acute foot and ankle injuries.
  • METHODS: Based on the treatment experience and recent literature, a commentary on acute foot and ankles injuries were given, included the basic and clinical research results, evaluation before operation, and treatment methods of the soft tissue and bone injuries.
  • RESULTS: The treatment of acute foot and ankle injuries is still a hot point in orthopaedic surgery.
  • The time delay between first debridement and injury within 24 hours does not increase the infection rate.
  • For the treatment of severe ankle fractures, attentions should be paid to the cartilage injury, and anatomic reduction, good realignment, and the congruity recovery are very important.
  • The treatment determination of calcaneal fractures depends on the fully understanding injury mechanisms, classifications, and treatment method.
  • Operation and fixation methods of Lisfranc injury depends on different injury types.
  • CONCLUSION: Acute foot and ankle injuries are common in clinical, to achieve a satisfactory result in evaluation and treatment, it is important to have a fully evaluation of the injury type, and choose best operation time and suitable treatment methods, as well as to fully understand the biomechanical characteristics of different regions.
  • [MeSH-major] Ankle Injuries / therapy. Foot Injuries / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Tendon Injuries

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  • (PMID = 21818935.001).
  • [ISSN] 1002-1892
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhongguo xiu fu chong jian wai ke za zhi = Zhongguo xiufu chongjian waike zazhi = Chinese journal of reparative and reconstructive surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhongguo Xiu Fu Chong Jian Wai Ke Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] China
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24. Smith JT, Halim K, Palms DA, Okike K, Bluman EM, Chiodo CP: Prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in patients with foot and ankle injuries. Foot Ankle Int; 2014 Jan;35(1):8-13
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in patients with foot and ankle injuries.
  • Although rates of vitamin D deficiency have been delineated in various orthopaedic populations, little is known about the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in patients with foot and ankle disorders.
  • The goal of this study was to identify the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in patients with a low energy fracture of the foot or ankle.
  • METHODS: Over a 6-month period, a serum 25-OH vitamin D level was obtained from consecutive patients with a low energy ankle fracture, fifth metatarsal base fracture, or stress fracture of the foot or ankle.
  • For comparative purposes, vitamin D levels in patients with an ankle sprain and no fracture were also examined.
  • RESULTS: The study cohort included 75 patients, of which 21 had an ankle fracture, 23 had a fifth metatarsal base fracture, and 31 had a stress fracture.
  • Vitamin D levels were significantly lower in those with a fracture than in those with an ankle sprain (P = .02).
  • CONCLUSION: Hypovitaminosis D was common among patients with a foot or ankle injury seen at our institution.
  • Patients with a low energy fracture of the foot or ankle were at particular risk for low vitamin D, especially if they smoked, were obese, or had other medical risk factors.
  • [MeSH-major] Ankle Injuries / epidemiology. Foot Injuries / epidemiology. Fractures, Bone / epidemiology. Vitamin D Deficiency / epidemiology
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Case-Control Studies. Female. Fractures, Stress / epidemiology. Humans. Male. Metatarsal Bones / injuries. Middle Aged. Multivariate Analysis. Obesity / epidemiology. Prevalence. Prospective Studies. Risk Factors. Smoking / epidemiology. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 24127268.001).
  • [ISSN] 1944-7876
  • [Journal-full-title] Foot & ankle international
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Foot Ankle Int
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Vitamin D deficiency / ankle fracture / hypovitaminosis D / metatarsal fracture / stress fracture
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25. Teh J, Suppiah R, Sharp R, Newton J: Imaging in the assessment and management of overuse injuries in the foot and ankle. Semin Musculoskelet Radiol; 2011 Feb;15(1):101-14
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Imaging in the assessment and management of overuse injuries in the foot and ankle.
  • Overuse injuries of the ankle and foot are common in the general and athletic populations.
  • The wide spectrum of overuse injuries includes ligamentous injuries, soft tissue and osseous impingement, osteochondral lesions, tendon injuries, and stress fractures.
  • Some conditions such as impingement syndromes and stress fractures may be missed on initial physical examination, and patients with such injuries often present to a sports or orthopedic clinic with persistent symptoms.
  • With the increasing participation in sports, health-care professionals involved in the care of athletes at all levels must have a thorough understanding of overuse conditions of the foot and ankle, and the use of imaging in the management of these conditions.
  • This article covers the clinical presentation, pertinent anatomy, imaging features, and management of overuse injuries of the foot and ankle.
  • [MeSH-major] Ankle Injuries / diagnosis. Ankle Injuries / therapy. Athletic Injuries / diagnosis. Athletic Injuries / therapy. Cumulative Trauma Disorders / diagnosis. Cumulative Trauma Disorders / therapy. Diagnostic Imaging. Foot Injuries / diagnosis. Foot Injuries / therapy


26. Jain N, Murray D, Kemp S, Calder J: Frequency and trends in foot and ankle injuries within an English Premier League Football Club using a new impact factor of injury to identify a focus for injury prevention. Foot Ankle Surg; 2014 Dec;20(4):237-40
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Frequency and trends in foot and ankle injuries within an English Premier League Football Club using a new impact factor of injury to identify a focus for injury prevention.
  • BACKGROUND: Foot and ankle injuries are common in football.
  • Prevention strategies exist in order to decrease the incidence of such injuries and minimize the number of days that a player is unavailable for selection.
  • METHODS: Injuries were recorded over a 4-season period while the team was playing in the English Premier League (EPL).
  • We present the epidemiology of foot and ankle injuries within a professional football club and offer a calculation that may be of use in the future to identify areas of injury prevention.
  • RESULTS: Anterior Talo-Fibular Ligament (ATFL) injuries and fifth metatarsal fractures were of high impact as they were both common and resulted in significant time periods where the player was unavailable.
  • CONCLUSIONS: This is the first time an EPL club has been prepared to publish data regarding injury.
  • Our findings may be used by others to focus their prevention strategies on the injuries with the highest impact.

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2014 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 25457658.001).
  • [ISSN] 1460-9584
  • [Journal-full-title] Foot and ankle surgery : official journal of the European Society of Foot and Ankle Surgeons
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Foot Ankle Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Football / Injury / Prevention / Return to play
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27. Lau LH, Kerr D, Law I, Ritchie P: Nurse practitioners treating ankle and foot injuries using the Ottawa Ankle Rules: a comparative study in the emergency department. Australas Emerg Nurs J; 2013 Aug;16(3):110-5
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Nurse practitioners treating ankle and foot injuries using the Ottawa Ankle Rules: a comparative study in the emergency department.
  • BACKGROUND: Nurse practitioners (NPs) in the Emergency Department (ED) have been trained to assess a range of clinical problems and minor complaints such as acute ankle injury.
  • This study compared assessment of suspected ankle and foot injuries using the Ottawa Ankle Rules (OAR) by NPs and ED medical doctors (ED-Drs).
  • NPs and ED-Drs recorded information for patients with acute ankle and/or mid-foot injuries on demographic characteristics, OAR features, use of X-ray and patient management.
  • CONCLUSION: This study suggests that NPs are less likely to miss significant fractures of the ankle and/or foot compared with ED-based medical registrars.
  • Future research should focus on actual use of the OAR and accuracy of X-ray assessment by NPs.
  • [MeSH-major] Ankle Injuries / diagnosis. Foot Injuries / diagnosis. Nurse Practitioners. Outcome Assessment (Health Care) / statistics & numerical data. Practice Guidelines as Topic
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Ankle Fractures. Child. Child, Preschool. False Negative Reactions. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Patient Selection. Physician's Practice Patterns. Prospective Studies. Reproducibility of Results. Young Adult

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2013 College of Emergency Nursing Australasia Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 23953094.001).
  • [ISSN] 1574-6267
  • [Journal-full-title] Australasian emergency nursing journal : AENJ
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Australas Emerg Nurs J
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Ankle / Emergencies / Nurse practitioner / X-rays
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28. Werner RA, Gell N, Hartigan A, Wiggermann N, Keyserling WM: Risk factors for foot and ankle disorders among assembly plant workers. Am J Ind Med; 2010 Dec;53(12):1233-9
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  • [Title] Risk factors for foot and ankle disorders among assembly plant workers.
  • BACKGROUND: Jobs that necessitate prolonged standing and walking activities are commonly associated with worker's complaints of foot and ankle pain.
  • The objective of this study was to determine the relative contributions of work activity (time spent standing, walking, or sitting), floor surface characteristics, weight, BMI, age, foot biomechanics, and other demographic and medical history factors to the prevalence of foot and ankle disorders.
  • The main outcome variable was foot or ankle disorders defined by pain and a positive physical examination.
  • The independent variables included baseline demographics, medical history, ergonomic exposures, psychosocial factors, shoe characteristics and foot biomechanics.
  • RESULTS: Twenty-four percent of the cohort met the case definition of foot/ankle disorder with 10% defined as new cases.
  • Fifty-two percent had symptoms of foot/ankle.
  • An increased risk of presenting with foot/ankle disorders was associated with high metatarsal pressure on gait assessment, increased time spent walking, female gender, reported high job dissatisfaction, a history of rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis or vascular disorder.
  • For the truck/forklift drivers, an increased number of times getting in and out of the vehicle was associated with a higher prevalence of ankle/foot problems.
  • [MeSH-major] Ankle Injuries / epidemiology. Arthralgia / epidemiology. Foot Injuries / epidemiology. Occupational Diseases / epidemiology. Occupational Exposure / adverse effects


29. Ramasamy A, Hill AM, Masouros S, Gibb I, Phillip R, Bull AM, Clasper JC: Outcomes of IED foot and ankle blast injuries. J Bone Joint Surg Am; 2013 Mar 6;95(5):e25
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  • [Title] Outcomes of IED foot and ankle blast injuries.
  • BACKGROUND: Improvements in protection and medical treatments have resulted in increasing numbers of modern-warfare casualties surviving with complex lower-extremity injuries.
  • To our knowledge, there has been no prior analysis of foot and ankle blast injuries as a result of improvised explosive devices (IEDs).
  • The aims of this study were to report the pattern of injury and determine which factors are associated with a poor clinical outcome.
  • METHODS: U.K. service personnel who had sustained lower leg injuries following an under-vehicle explosion from January 2006 to December 2008 were identified with the use of a prospective trauma registry.
  • Patient demographics, injury severity, the nature of the lower leg injury, and the type of clinical management were recorded.
  • RESULTS: Sixty-three U.K. service personnel (eighty-nine injured limbs) with lower leg injuries from an explosion were identified.
  • Fifty-one percent of the casualties sustained multisegmental injuries to the foot and ankle.
  • Twenty-six legs (29%) required amputation, with six of them amputated because of chronic pain eighteen months following injury.
  • Regression analysis revealed that hindfoot injuries, open fractures, and vascular injuries were independent predictors of amputation.
  • At the time of final follow-up, sixty-six (74%) of the injured limbs had persisting symptoms related to the injury, and only nine (14%) of the service members were fit to return to their preinjury duties.
  • CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that foot and ankle injuries from IEDs are associated with a high amputation rate and frequently with a poor clinical outcome.
  • [MeSH-major] Amputation / statistics & numerical data. Ankle Injuries / surgery. Blast Injuries / surgery. Foot Injuries / surgery. Limb Salvage / statistics & numerical data
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Afghan Campaign 2001-. Bombs. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Injury Severity Score. Iraq War, 2003-2011. Logistic Models. Postoperative Complications / epidemiology. Postoperative Complications / surgery. Recovery of Function. Registries. Retrospective Studies. Risk Factors. Treatment Outcome

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  • (PMID = 23467873.001).
  • [ISSN] 1535-1386
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of bone and joint surgery. American volume
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Bone Joint Surg Am
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Evaluation Studies; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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30. Greenhagen RM, Johnson AR, Bevilacqua NJ: Smoking cessation: the role of the foot and ankle surgeon. Foot Ankle Spec; 2010 Feb;3(1):21-8
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  • [Title] Smoking cessation: the role of the foot and ankle surgeon.
  • These negative effects are a concern for the foot and ankle surgeon, as smoking can increase the risk of diabetes and peripheral artery disease and delay healing of surgical incisions and ulcerations of the lower extremities.
  • Smoking cessation is an important component in the overall treatment of conditions affecting the foot and ankle.
  • [MeSH-major] Lower Extremity / surgery. Patient Education as Topic. Smoking Cessation. Tobacco Use Disorder / complications
  • [MeSH-minor] Amputation. Fractures, Bone / etiology. Fractures, Bone / surgery. Humans. Osteonecrosis / etiology. Osteonecrosis / surgery. Peripheral Vascular Diseases / etiology. Physician-Patient Relations. Talus / injuries. Wound Healing / physiology

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  • (PMID = 20400436.001).
  • [ISSN] 1938-7636
  • [Journal-full-title] Foot & ankle specialist
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Foot Ankle Spec
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 51
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31. Farrugia P, Goldstein C, Petrisor BA: Measuring foot and ankle injury outcomes: common scales and checklists. Injury; 2011 Mar;42(3):276-80
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  • [Title] Measuring foot and ankle injury outcomes: common scales and checklists.
  • Whilst outcome measures can be generic, there are a number of foot and ankle specific measures available and in use.
  • Continued work however is being done in this area and these challenges provide opportunities for further investigation into the role of functional outcome scores specific to the foot and ankle.
  • [MeSH-major] Ankle Injuries. Foot Injuries. Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

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  • [Copyright] Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 21232744.001).
  • [ISSN] 1879-0267
  • [Journal-full-title] Injury
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Injury
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
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32. Hanlon DP: Leg, ankle, and foot injuries. Emerg Med Clin North Am; 2010 Nov;28(4):885-905
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  • [Title] Leg, ankle, and foot injuries.
  • The emergency provider (EP) must be aware of the anatomy of the leg, ankle, and foot.
  • The varied presentation of common injuries must be recognized as well as the unique presentations of uncommon injuries.
  • The astute EP must rely on a focused history and a precise examination to avoid the pitfalls and missed injuries from an over-reliance on radiographic studies.
  • Potential complications associated with these injuries must be anticipated and avoided if possible.
  • [MeSH-major] Ankle Injuries / diagnosis. Foot Injuries / diagnosis. Orthopedic Procedures / methods. Trauma Centers / organization & administration
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Leg Injuries / diagnosis. Leg Injuries / therapy. United States

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 20971396.001).
  • [ISSN] 1558-0539
  • [Journal-full-title] Emergency medicine clinics of North America
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Emerg. Med. Clin. North Am.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
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33. Grabowski AM, D'Andrea S: Effects of a powered ankle-foot prosthesis on kinetic loading of the unaffected leg during level-ground walking. J Neuroeng Rehabil; 2013;10:49
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  • [Title] Effects of a powered ankle-foot prosthesis on kinetic loading of the unaffected leg during level-ground walking.
  • BACKGROUND: People with a lower-extremity amputation that use conventional passive-elastic ankle-foot prostheses encounter a series of stress-related challenges during walking such as greater forces on their unaffected leg, and may thus be predisposed to secondary musculoskeletal injuries such as chronic joint disorders.
  • Previous studies have hypothesized that the development of this disorder is linked to the abnormally high peak knee external adduction moments encountered during walking.
  • An ankle-foot prosthesis that supplies biomimetic power could potentially mitigate the forces and knee adduction moments applied to the unaffected leg of a person with a transtibial amputation, which could, in turn, reduce the risk of knee osteoarthritis.
  • We hypothesized that compared to using a passive-elastic prosthesis, people with a transtibial amputation using a powered ankle-foot prosthesis would have lower peak resultant ground reaction forces, peak external knee adduction moments, and corresponding loading rates applied to their unaffected leg during walking over a wide range of speeds.
  • Subjects with an amputation walked while using their own passive-elastic prosthesis and a powered ankle-foot prosthesis capable of providing net positive mechanical work and powered ankle plantar flexion during late stance.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Use of a biomimetic powered ankle-foot prosthesis decreased peak resultant force at slow and moderate speeds and knee external adduction moment at moderate and fast speeds on the unaffected leg of people with a transtibial amputation during level-ground walking.
  • Thus, use of an ankle-foot prosthesis that provides net positive mechanical work could reduce the risk of comorbidities such as knee osteoarthritis.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Amputees. Ankle Joint / physiology. Biomechanical Phenomena. Humans. Leg / physiology. Male. Middle Aged

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  • (PMID = 23758860.001).
  • [ISSN] 1743-0003
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neuroengineering and rehabilitation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Neuroeng Rehabil
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3685554
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34. Ursone RL: Unique complications of foot and ankle injuries secondary to warfare. Foot Ankle Clin; 2010 Mar;15(1):201-8
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  • [Title] Unique complications of foot and ankle injuries secondary to warfare.
  • This article discusses the common complications associated with lower extremity trauma and amputations secondary to combat injuries.
  • Although there is some literature on these topics, most is based on noncombat injuries, indicating a need for further research into the management of these devastating injuries.
  • [MeSH-major] Blast Injuries / complications. Fracture Fixation, Internal / adverse effects. Leg Injuries / complications. Leg Injuries / surgery. War
  • [MeSH-minor] Amputation / adverse effects. Ankle Injuries / complications. Ankle Injuries / surgery. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Foot Injuries / complications. Foot Injuries / surgery. Humans. Incidence. Male. Postoperative Complications / diagnosis. Postoperative Complications / epidemiology. Reconstructive Surgical Procedures / adverse effects. Reconstructive Surgical Procedures / methods. Risk Assessment. Surgical Wound Infection / diagnosis. Surgical Wound Infection / epidemiology. Wound Healing / physiology

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 20189125.001).
  • [ISSN] 1558-1934
  • [Journal-full-title] Foot and ankle clinics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Foot Ankle Clin
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 44
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35. Nazarenko A, Beltran LS, Bencardino JT: Imaging evaluation of traumatic ligamentous injuries of the ankle and foot. Radiol Clin North Am; 2013 May;51(3):455-78
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  • [Title] Imaging evaluation of traumatic ligamentous injuries of the ankle and foot.
  • Sports ankle injuries are very common worldwide.
  • In the United States, it is estimated that 2 million acute ankle sprains occur each year, averaging to $318 to $914 per sprain.
  • Magnetic resonance imaging is excellent for depicting normal ankle anatomy and can elegantly demonstrate ligamentous injuries of the ankle and associated conditions after ankle sprain.
  • This article encompasses epidemiology, biomechanics, normal anatomy, and pathologic conditions of the ankle and foot ligaments.
  • The specific ligaments discussed include the syndesmotic ligaments, lateral ligament complex of the ankle, deltoid ligament, spring ligament, ligaments of the sinus tarsi, and the Lisfranc ligament.
  • [MeSH-major] Ankle Injuries / diagnosis. Athletic Injuries / diagnosis. Foot Injuries / diagnosis. Ligaments, Articular / injuries. Magnetic Resonance Imaging / methods


36. Stein CJ, Tyson KD, Johnson VM, Popoli DM, d'Hemecourt PA, Micheli LJ: Injuries in Irish dance. J Dance Med Sci; 2013 Dec;17(4):159-64
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  • [Title] Injuries in Irish dance.
  • The purpose of this study was to analyze the types of dance injuries incurred by Irish dancers.
  • A chart review was performed to identify all injuries associated with Irish dance seen in the sports medicine or orthopaedic clinics at the investigators' hospital over an 11-year period.
  • "Injury" was defined as any dance-related pain or disorder that led to evaluation in the clinics.
  • Ultimately, 255 patients from over 30 different schools of dance were seen with injuries directly related (726 clinic visits) or partially related (199 visits) to Irish dance.
  • Almost 80% of the injuries (348/437) were attributable to overuse, and 20.4% were acute and traumatic injuries (89/437).
  • Ninety-five percent (95.9%) of injuries involved the hip or lower extremity.
  • The most common sites were the foot (33.2%), ankle (22.7%), knee (19.7%), and hip (14.4%).
  • Typical diagnoses were tendon injury (13.3%), apophysitis (11.4%), patellofemoral pain and instability (10.8%), stress injury (10.1%), and muscle injury (7.8%).
  • The majority of traumatic injuries were seen in clinic within 3 weeks, but less than a quarter of overuse injuries were seen that quickly.
  • The most common treatment, prescribed to 84.3% of patients, was physical therapy and home exercises, and the majority of dancers (64.3%) were able to return to full dance activity after injury.
  • [MeSH-major] Dancing / injuries
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Ankle Injuries / epidemiology. Ankle Injuries / rehabilitation. Child. Child, Preschool. Cumulative Trauma Disorders / epidemiology. Cumulative Trauma Disorders / rehabilitation. Female. Foot Injuries / epidemiology. Foot Injuries / rehabilitation. Hip Injuries / epidemiology. Hip Injuries / rehabilitation. Humans. Knee Injuries / epidemiology. Knee Injuries / rehabilitation. Male. Middle Aged. Physical Therapy Modalities. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 24565331.001).
  • [ISSN] 1089-313X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of dance medicine & science : official publication of the International Association for Dance Medicine & Science
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Dance Med Sci
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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37. Orr J, Kirk KL, Antunez V, Ficke J: Reverse sural artery flap for reconstruction of blast injuries of the foot and ankle. Foot Ankle Int; 2010 Jan;31(1):59-64
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  • [Title] Reverse sural artery flap for reconstruction of blast injuries of the foot and ankle.
  • BACKGROUND: The reverse sural artery fasciocutaneous flap is a versatile soft tissue coverage procedure for traumatic soft tissue defects of the distal tibia, ankle, and foot.
  • War-related blast injuries represent a unique injury mechanism.
  • There are no reports on use of this reconstructive flap in treating highly contaminated war-related musculoskeletal trauma of the foot and ankle.
  • The current study presents results using this soft tissue coverage procedure in a subacute fashion to treat a population of war-related blast injuries.
  • All injuries occurred between 2003 and 2008 as a result of severe war-related blast injuries.
  • RESULTS: All ten patients sustained Gustilo Type IIIB open fractures within the zones of injuries secondary to high energy blasts.
  • Average time to flap coverage was 37 (range, 18 to 112) days post-injury.
  • CONCLUSION: In appropriately selected patients with significant open bony and soft tissue trauma to the foot and ankle, the reverse sural artery fasciocutaneous flap should be considered as a viable first option for soft tissue coverage, even in cases of subacute coverage.
  • [MeSH-major] Ankle Injuries / surgery. Blast Injuries / surgery. Foot Injuries / surgery. Surgical Flaps / blood supply


38. Demiralp B, Ege T, Kose O, Yurttas Y, Basbozkurt M: Amputation versus functional reconstruction in the management of complex hind foot injuries caused by land-mine explosions: a long-term retrospective comparison. Eur J Orthop Surg Traumatol; 2014 May;24(4):621-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Amputation versus functional reconstruction in the management of complex hind foot injuries caused by land-mine explosions: a long-term retrospective comparison.
  • The purpose of this study is to compare the long-term clinical outcomes of patients who were treated with either hind foot reconstruction or amputation in complex hind foot injuries accompanied with bone and soft tissue loss due to land-mine explosions.
  • Between 1994 and 2004, all patients with hind foot complex injuries due to land-mine explosion, who were operated in our clinic, were enrolled to the study.
  • All patients were evaluated with Short-Form 36 (SF-36), Foot and Ankle Disability Index (FADI) and Body Image Quality of Life Inventory (BIQLI) after a mean of 15.1 ± 2.2 (range 9-19) years of follow-up.
  • Major complications in Gr I were musculocutaneous flap atrophy in calcaneal region (n = 8 patients), limited ankle motion (n = 11) and painful osteophytes on plantar region (n = 6).
  • If the dorsalis pedis is intact and midfoot and forefoot is relatively protected, hind foot reconstruction should be attempted.
  • Long-term outcomes of hind foot reconstruction are satisfactory with minor complications and better BIQLI.
  • [MeSH-major] Amputation / methods. Blast Injuries / surgery. Foot Injuries / surgery. Ilizarov Technique. Limb Salvage / methods. Reconstructive Surgical Procedures / methods
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Arthralgia / etiology. Calcaneus / injuries. Calcaneus / surgery. Depressive Disorder, Major / etiology. Disability Evaluation. Follow-Up Studies. Heel / injuries. Heel / surgery. Humans. Male. Osteophyte / etiology. Quality of Life. Retrospective Studies. Surgical Flaps. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 24158743.001).
  • [ISSN] 1633-8065
  • [Journal-full-title] European journal of orthopaedic surgery & traumatology : orthopédie traumatologie
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Eur J Orthop Surg Traumatol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] France
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39. Miyamoto W, Takao M, Matsushita T: Anterior fibrous bundle: a cause of residual pain and restrictive plantar flexion following ankle sprain. Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc; 2013 Jun;21(6):1385-9
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  • [Title] Anterior fibrous bundle: a cause of residual pain and restrictive plantar flexion following ankle sprain.
  • PURPOSE: To describe anterior fibrous bundle as an intra-articular residual disorder following ankle sprain.
  • METHODS: Between January 1998 and January 2009, we performed arthroscopy on 10 patients (7 males, 3 females; median age, 25 years; age range, 17-43 years) who had the uncommon problem of anterior ankle pain accompanied by restriction of plantar flexion following an ankle sprain.
  • Outcome was measured using the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society Ankle-Hindfoot Scale (AOFAS) score, Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for pain and active plantar flexion angle.
  • CONCLUSIONS: An anterior fibrous bundle is one of the intra-articular residual disorders after ankle sprain that can cause restriction of plantar flexion.
  • [MeSH-major] Ankle Injuries / pathology. Chronic Pain / etiology

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  • (PMID = 22622780.001).
  • [ISSN] 1433-7347
  • [Journal-full-title] Knee surgery, sports traumatology, arthroscopy : official journal of the ESSKA
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Germany
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40. Chiu HJ, Chan CL, Hsu JC, Chung CY, Yu IL, Renn JH, Chang NT, Yang NP: Nationwide retrospective cohort survey of orthopedic injuries in members of the Taiwanese population with psychiatric disorders, 2000-2005. J Orthop Sci; 2013 May;18(3):456-64
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Nationwide retrospective cohort survey of orthopedic injuries in members of the Taiwanese population with psychiatric disorders, 2000-2005.
  • BACKGROUND: The relationship between psychiatric disorders and musculoskeletal injuries is interesting but has not been investigated in depth.
  • Another cohort-based case-control study was designed, and one sex-matched and age-matched (1:1) control group randomly selected from the population without any prevalent psychiatric disorder in 2000 and incident psychiatric disorder in 2001-2005 was used for comparison.
  • RESULTS: 64,662 Taiwanese people with any prevalent psychiatric disorder were enrolled in this study in 2000.
  • The 6-year cumulative incidences of orthopedic injuries were 13.61/10,000 for femoral neck/femur fracture and 4.64/10,000, 3.40/10,000, 3.25/10,000, and 3.09/10,000 for radius/ulna or hand fracture, tibia/fibula or patella fracture, ankle or foot fracture, and humeral fracture, respectively.
  • Compared with the control group, this Taiwanese population with prevalent psychiatric disorders had fewer incidences of all orthopedic injuries during the 6 years since 2000, and their cumulative incidence ratios ranged from 0.04 to 0.4 for the different injury sites.
  • CONCLUSION: Subjects with prevalent psychiatric disorders had fewer occurrences of orthopedic injuries than the general population.


41. Chhabra A, Soldatos T, Chalian M, Faridian-Aragh N, Fritz J, Fayad LM, Carrino JA, Schon L: 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of posterior tibial tendon dysfunction with relevance to clinical staging. J Foot Ankle Surg; 2011 May-Jun;50(3):320-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • The posterior tibial tendon (PTT) is the most important dynamic stabilizer of the medial ankle and longitudinal arch of the foot.
  • PTT dysfunction is a degenerative disorder of the tendon, which secondarily involves multiple ligaments, joint capsules, fascia, articulations, and bony structures of the ankle, hindfoot, midfoot, and forefoot.
  • [MeSH-major] Magnetic Resonance Imaging / instrumentation. Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction / diagnosis. Tendon Injuries / diagnosis

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2011 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 21459628.001).
  • [ISSN] 1542-2224
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of foot and ankle surgery : official publication of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Foot Ankle Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
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42. Tekin L, Zor F, Akarsu S, Tuncer SK, Oztürk S, Oztürk S: Quality of life and functionality of patients with heel reconstruction after landmine explosions. PM R; 2013 Jul;5(7):591-5
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • BACKGROUND: Landmine injuries cause extensive soft and bony tissue loss of the weight-bearing areas, particularly the heel.
  • Reconstruction of these injuries is challenging, and there are no studies that report long-term functional results.
  • OBJECTIVE: To determine the quality of life and long-term functionality of patients who had heel reconstruction with free muscle flap after landmine injuries.
  • Ten male volunteers without any gait disorder were included in the study as the control group.
  • Mean Freiburg Ankle scores showed moderate functionality.
  • CONCLUSION: Despite the associated physical and emotional trauma, combat-injured veterans with heel reconstruction after landmine injuries had adequate and functional ambulation at long-term follow-up.
  • [MeSH-major] Blast Injuries / psychology. Blast Injuries / surgery. Foot Injuries / psychology. Foot Injuries / surgery. Heel / injuries. Quality of Life. Surgical Flaps / blood supply
  • [MeSH-minor] Activities of Daily Living. Adaptation, Physiological. Adult. Case-Control Studies. Explosions. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Injury Severity Score. Male. Pain Measurement. Reconstructive Surgical Procedures / methods. Reconstructive Surgical Procedures / rehabilitation. Recovery of Function. Risk Assessment. Statistics, Nonparametric. Treatment Outcome. Weight-Bearing. Young Adult

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 23399298.001).
  • [ISSN] 1934-1563
  • [Journal-full-title] PM & R : the journal of injury, function, and rehabilitation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] PM R
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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43. Bosman HA, Robinson AH: Treatment of ankle instability with an associated cavus deformity. Foot Ankle Clin; 2013 Dec;18(4):643-57
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Treatment of ankle instability with an associated cavus deformity.
  • This article reviews the role of cavus in foot and ankle injury and summarizes the current surgical and nonsurgical treatments.
  • Recognition of foot position is crucial in the management of ankle instability associated with cavovarus.
  • Correcting foot alignment with orthoses or surgery improves the mechanics of the ankle, reducing the risk of instability and potentially delaying the onset of posttraumatic ankle arthritis.
  • [MeSH-major] Ankle Joint. Foot Deformities / therapy. Joint Instability / therapy

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 24215830.001).
  • [ISSN] 1558-1934
  • [Journal-full-title] Foot and ankle clinics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Foot Ankle Clin
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Ankle / Cavus / Foot / Heel / Ligaments / Orthosis / Surgery / Varus
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44. Teixeira LM, Pires T, Silva RD, de Resende MA: Immediate effect of a single anteroposterior talus mobilization on dorsiflexion range of motion in participants with orthopedic dysfunction of the ankle and foot. J Manipulative Physiol Ther; 2013 Jul-Aug;36(6):369-75
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Immediate effect of a single anteroposterior talus mobilization on dorsiflexion range of motion in participants with orthopedic dysfunction of the ankle and foot.
  • OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to determine the immediate effects of a single anteroposterior mobilization of the talus on the active dorsiflexion range of motion (ROM) in participants with different orthopedic foot and ankle injuries.
  • METHODS: This study included 30 male and female participants aged 18 to 50 years with unilateral orthopedic foot and ankle dysfunction.
  • Participants received either joint mobilization or manual contact (control) on the affected ankle.
  • CONCLUSION: A single session of articular mobilization of the talus did not significantly increase dorsiflexion ROM in participants with orthopedic dysfunctions of the ankle and foot compared with a manual contact procedure.
  • [MeSH-major] Ankle Injuries / rehabilitation. Foot Injuries / rehabilitation. Physical Therapy Modalities

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2013 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 23850371.001).
  • [ISSN] 1532-6586
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of manipulative and physiological therapeutics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Manipulative Physiol Ther
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Ankle / Joint Range of Motion / Manual Therapy / Mobilization
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45. Hawson ST: Physical therapy and rehabilitation of the foot and ankle in the athlete. Clin Podiatr Med Surg; 2011 Jan;28(1):189-201
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Physical therapy and rehabilitation of the foot and ankle in the athlete.
  • Foot and ankle injuries in athletes are common.
  • Physical therapy plays a fundamental role in the management of sports injuries.
  • The purpose of this article is to (1) raise awareness for using physical therapy for treatment of foot and ankle injuries in athletes, (2) discuss considerations specific to athletes during the rehabilitation process, and (3) increase the reader's knowledge about the in-depth role of physical therapy in the management of foot and ankle injuries in athletes.
  • [MeSH-major] Ankle Injuries / rehabilitation. Athletic Injuries / rehabilitation. Foot Injuries / rehabilitation. Physical Therapy Modalities
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Exercise Therapy / methods. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Injury Severity Score. Male. Range of Motion, Articular / physiology. Recovery of Function. Treatment Outcome. Young Adult


46. Cahalan R, Purtill H, O'Sullivan P, O'Sullivan K: Foot and ankle pain and injuries in elite adult Irish dancers. Med Probl Perform Art; 2014 Dec;29(4):198-206
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Foot and ankle pain and injuries in elite adult Irish dancers.
  • BACKGROUND: In Irish dance, the foot and ankle are the structures most commonly affected by pain and injury, but there is scant research examining the potential factors placing Irish dancers at risk of sustaining pain and injury in the foot and ankle.
  • STUDY DESIGN: An observational study examining the factors linked to pain and injury in the foot and ankle in elite adult Irish dancers.
  • METHODS: The biopsychosocial characteristics of 29 subjects with no previous pain and injury in the foot and ankle were compared to 53 subjects who cited the foot and ankle as their most troublesome bodily area.
  • The MT group reported more severe levels of day-to-day pain (p=0.038), greater bothersomeness of daily pain (p=0.005), more subjective health complaints (p=0.024), more psychological complaints (p=0.030), and a greater number of bodily areas experiencing pain and injury (p=0.025).
  • CONCLUSIONS: Pain and injury in the foot and ankle in elite adult Irish dancers is commonplace and comparable to levels of injury in other elite forms of dance.
  • A complex mix of biopsychosocial factors is associated with pain and injury in the foot and ankle in this cohort.
  • [MeSH-major] Ankle Injuries / epidemiology. Cumulative Trauma Disorders / epidemiology. Dancing / injuries. Foot Injuries / epidemiology. Health Status. Trauma Severity Indices

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  • (PMID = 25433256.001).
  • [ISSN] 0885-1158
  • [Journal-full-title] Medical problems of performing artists
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Med Probl Perform Art
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Observational Study; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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47. Goldstein CL, Schemitsch E, Bhandari M, Mathew G, Petrisor BA: Comparison of different outcome instruments following foot and ankle trauma. Foot Ankle Int; 2010 Dec;31(12):1075-80
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Comparison of different outcome instruments following foot and ankle trauma.
  • BACKGROUND: Identifying optimal treatment strategies in patients with traumatic foot and ankle injuries has been hampered by the use of multiple available outcome measures with unproven reliability and validity.
  • This prospective observational study aimed to measure the correlation between six functional outcome measures in patients with traumatic foot and ankle injuries.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients 18 years of age or older with a traumatic foot or ankle injury completed the Short Form-12 (SF-12), Short Musculoskeletal Functional Assessment (SMFA), Foot Function Index (FFI), Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM), American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons (AAOS), Foot and Ankle Questionnaire and American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) Ankle-Hindfoot Scale at a single followup visit.
  • The strongest correlations were found between the SMFA, FFI, FAAM and AAOS Foot and Ankle Questionnaire.
  • CONCLUSION: High correlations between scores on six commonly used functional outcome instruments suggest it is likely unnecessary to use more than one instrument when examining functional outcome in patients with traumatic foot and ankle injuries.
  • [MeSH-major] Ankle Injuries / therapy. Foot Injuries / therapy. Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

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  • (PMID = 21189208.001).
  • [ISSN] 1071-1007
  • [Journal-full-title] Foot & ankle international
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Foot Ankle Int
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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48. O'Connor AM, James IT: Association of lower limb injury with boot cleat design and playing surface in elite soccer. Foot Ankle Clin; 2013 Jun;18(2):369-80
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Association of lower limb injury with boot cleat design and playing surface in elite soccer.
  • Reducing external injury risk factors associated with the boot-surface interaction is important in reducing the incidence and severity of foot and ankle injury.
  • A review of prospective football (soccer) injury epidemiology studies determined that the incidence of noncontact ankle sprain injury is relatively high.
  • Research on the impact of cleat shape and configuration and boot design on the boot-surface interaction is providing new understanding of the impact on player biomechanics and injury risk but is not keeping pace with commercial advances in boot design and innovation in natural and synthetic turf surface technology.
  • [MeSH-major] Ankle Injuries / etiology. Athletic Injuries / etiology. Football / injuries. Leg Injuries / etiology. Shoes / adverse effects. Soccer / injuries
  • [MeSH-minor] Biomechanical Phenomena. Foot Orthoses. Humans. Surface Properties


49. Bertola IP, Sartori RP, Corrêa DG, Zotz TG, Gomes AR: Profile of injures prevalence in athletes who participated in SESC Triathlon Caiobá-2011. Acta Ortop Bras; 2014;22(4):191-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • OBJECTIVE: To identify the prevalence of injuries occurred during training and/or competition in triathlon athletes at SESC Triathlon Caiobá-2011.
  • RESULTS: Athletes reported time of practice between 3 to 6 years (20%), training frequency of 5 days per week (48%), at least one injury during trainings (76%).
  • The prevalence of injuries according to the sports category was: running (79%), cycling (16%) and swimming (5%).
  • Female athletes reported 92% of injuries during running training and 35% of those injuries were on ankle and foot.
  • During competition only two athletes reported injuries.
  • Muscle injury was the most prevalent (54%) among male athletes, followed by tendon (19%), ligament (17%) and bone (9%) injuries.
  • Among female athletes prevalent injuries were: 32% muscle, 32% bone, 32% tendon and only 4% ligament injuries.
  • CONCLUSION: Skeletal muscle injuries were the most commom lesions during running training, however, male athletes reported mostly calf injuries, while female had mostly ankle and foot injuries.

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  • (PMID = 25246848.001).
  • [ISSN] 1413-7852
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta ortopedica brasileira
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Ortop Bras
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Brazil
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC4167042
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Athletic injuries / Bicycling / Prevalence / Running / Swimming
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50. Battiston B, Antonini A, Tos P, Daghino W, Massazza G, Riccio M: Microvascular reconstructions of traumatic-combined tissue loss at foot and ankle level. Microsurgery; 2011 Mar;31(3):212-7
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Microvascular reconstructions of traumatic-combined tissue loss at foot and ankle level.
  • Severe injuries at foot and ankle level with loss of soft tissues and bone are often treated by means of amputation.
  • The transfer of composite free flaps from various donor sites may provide anatomical reconstruction of the foot and ankle and function.
  • Ten patients who sustained severe combined tissue injuries of the foot requiring reconstruction with composite free flaps were studied with a mean follow-up of 3.4 years.
  • Bone integration and healing was observed with satisfactory foot morphology.
  • Our results showed that microvascular flaps afford successful combined tissue reconstruction of the foot.
  • [MeSH-major] Ankle Injuries / surgery. Bone Transplantation / methods. Foot Injuries / surgery. Free Tissue Flaps. Limb Salvage / methods. Microsurgery


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