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1. Biomedical articles (top 50; 2009 to 2014)
1. |||||..... 50%  Badekas T, Papadakis SA, Vergados N, Galanakos SP, Siapkara A, Forgrave M, Romansky N, Mirones S, Trnka HJ, Delmi M: Foot and ankle injuries during the Athens 2004 Olympic Games. J Foot Ankle Res; 2009;2:9
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Foot and ankle injuries during the Athens 2004 Olympic Games.
  • This study concerns an epidemiological analysis of foot and ankle injuries during the Games.
  • METHODS: An observational, epidemiological survey was used to analyse injuries in all sport tournaments (men's and women's) over the period of the Games.
  • RESULTS: A total of 624 injuries (525 soft tissue injuries and 99 bony injuries) were reported.
  • Significantly more injuries in male (58%) versus female athletes (42%) were recorded.
  • The incidence, diagnosis and cause of injuries differed substantially between the team sports.

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  • (PMID = 19361341.001).
  • [ISSN] 1757-1146
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of foot and ankle research
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Foot Ankle Res
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC2672073
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2. |||||..... 50%  Chinn L, Hertel J: Rehabilitation of ankle and foot injuries in athletes. Clin Sports Med; 2010 Jan;29(1):157-67, table of contents
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Rehabilitation of ankle and foot injuries in athletes.
  • Foot and ankle injuries are extremely common among athletes and other physically active individuals.
  • Rehabilitation programs that emphasize the use of therapeutic exercise to restore joint range of motion, muscle strength, neuromuscular coordination, and gait mechanics have been shown to have clinical success for patients suffering various foot and ankle pathologies.
  • Rehabilitation programs are discussed for ankle sprains, plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendonitis, and turf toe.
  • [MeSH-major] Ankle Injuries / rehabilitation. Athletic Injuries / rehabilitation. Foot Injuries / rehabilitation

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  • (PMID = 19945591.001).
  • [ISSN] 1556-228X
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinics in sports medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Sports Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NCCAM NIH HHS / AT / 1R21AT004195; United States / NCCAM NIH HHS / AT / R21 AT004195-01A2
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS145158; NLM/ PMC2786815
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3. |||||..... 50%  Herscovici D Jr, Scaduto JM: Management of high-energy foot and ankle injuries in the geriatric population. Geriatr Orthop Surg Rehabil; 2012 Mar;3(1):33-44
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  • [Title] Management of high-energy foot and ankle injuries in the geriatric population.
  • From January 1989 through December 2010, a total of 494 elderly patients with 536 foot and ankle injuries were identified.
  • Within this group, 237 (48%) patients with 294 injuries were sustained as a result of a high-energy mechanism.
  • These mechanisms consisted of 170 motor vehicle accidents, 30 as a result of high (not ground level) energy falls, 2 from industrial accidents, and 35 classified as other, which included sports, blunt trauma, bicycle, airplane or boating accidents, crush injuries, and injuries resulting from a lawn mower.
  • The injuries produced were 17 metatarsal fractures, 9 Lisfranc injuries, 10 midfoot (navicular, cuneiform, or cuboid) fractures, 23 talus fractures, 63 calcaneal fractures, 73 unimalleolar, bimalleolar, or trimalleolar ankle fractures, 45 pilon fractures, and 3 pure dislocations of the foot or ankle.
  • Overall, 243 (83%) of these injuries underwent surgical fixation and data have shown that when surgery is used to manage high-energy injuries of the foot and ankle in the elderly individuals, the complications and outcomes are similar to those seen in younger patients.
  • Therefore, the decision for surgical intervention for high-energy injuries of the foot and ankle should be based primarily on the injury pattern and not solely on the age of the patient.

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  • (PMID = 23569695.001).
  • [ISSN] 2151-4585
  • [Journal-full-title] Geriatric orthopaedic surgery & rehabilitation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Geriatr Orthop Surg Rehabil
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3617904
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; elderly / foot and ankle / geriatric / high-energy injuries
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4. |||||..... 50%  Terrier P, Luthi F, Dériaz O: Do orthopaedic shoes improve local dynamic stability of gait? An observational study in patients with chronic foot and ankle injuries. BMC Musculoskelet Disord; 2013;14:94
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Do orthopaedic shoes improve local dynamic stability of gait? An observational study in patients with chronic foot and ankle injuries.
  • BACKGROUND: Complex foot and ankle fractures, such as calcaneum fractures or Lisfranc dislocations, are often associated with a poor outcome, especially in terms of gait capacity.
  • The aim of this study was to analyze changes in LDS induced by orthopaedic shoes in patients with persistent foot and ankle injuries.
  • They were treated for chronic post-traumatic disabilities following ankle and/or foot fractures in a Swiss rehabilitation clinic.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Footwear adaptation led to pain relief and to improved foot & ankle proprioception.
  • It is likely that that enhancement allows patients to better control foot placement.
  • [MeSH-major] Ankle Injuries / rehabilitation. Foot Injuries / rehabilitation. Foot Orthoses. Fractures, Bone / rehabilitation. Gait. Shoes

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  • (PMID = 23496924.001).
  • [ISSN] 1471-2474
  • [Journal-full-title] BMC musculoskeletal disorders
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BMC Musculoskelet Disord
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3608952
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5. |||||..... 49%  Steinberg N, Siev-Ner I, Peleg S, Dar G, Masharawi Y, Zeev A, Hershkovitz I: Injuries in female dancers aged 8 to 16 years. J Athl Train; 2013 Jan-Feb;48(1):118-23
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Injuries in female dancers aged 8 to 16 years.
  • OBJECTIVE: To identify the types of injuries sustained by recreational dancers and to examine their association with age, joint range of motion, body structure, age at menarche, presence of anatomic anomalies, and physical burden (i.e., practice hours en pointe).
  • MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Dependent variables were 61 types of current injuries that were later classified into 4 major categories: knee injuries, foot and ankle tendinopathy, back injuries, and other injuries.
  • Independent variables were age, joint range of motion, body size and shape, age at menarche, anatomic anomalies, and dance discipline (e.g., hours of practice per week en pointe).
  • RESULTS: At least 1 previous injury had been sustained by 42.4% of the dancers.
  • The most common injuries involved the knee (40.4%), followed by other injuries (23.4%).
  • The relative frequency of back injuries and tendinopathy decreased with age, whereas knee injuries increased.
  • Types of injuries were significantly associated with ankle plantar flexion, hip external rotation, hip abduction, and knee flexion.
  • Multinomial regression analysis revealed only 3 predictive variables (with other as baseline), all for back injury: scoliosis, age, and hip external rotation.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Joint range of motion and scoliosis may signal the potential for future injury.
  • [MeSH-major] Dancing / injuries

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  • (PMID = 23672333.001).
  • [ISSN] 1938-162X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of athletic training
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Athl Train
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3554026
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6. |||||..... 49%  Rethnam U, Makwana N: Are old running shoes detrimental to your feet? A pedobarographic study. BMC Res Notes; 2011;4:307
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  • BACKGROUND: Footwear characteristics have been implicated in fatigue and foot pain.
  • FINDINGS: This was a prospective study involving 11 healthy female volunteers with no previous foot and ankle problems.
  • The risk of injury to the foot and ankle would appear to be higher if running shoes are changed frequently.

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  • (PMID = 21864342.001).
  • [ISSN] 1756-0500
  • [Journal-full-title] BMC research notes
  • [ISO-abbreviation] BMC Res Notes
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3228510
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7. |||||..... 49%  Brumitt J, Heiderscheit BC, Manske RC, Niemuth PE, Rauh MJ: Lower extremity functional tests and risk of injury in division iii collegiate athletes. Int J Sports Phys Ther; 2013 Jun;8(3):216-27
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Lower extremity functional tests and risk of injury in division iii collegiate athletes.
  • The purpose of this prospective cohort study was to determine the ability of the standing long jump (SLJ) test, the single-leg hop (SLH) for distance test, and the lower extremity functional test (LEFT) as preseason screening tools to identify collegiate athletes who may be at increased risk for a time-loss sports-related low back or lower extremity injury.
  • The athletes were then prospectively followed during their sports season for occurrence of low back or LE injury.
  • RESULTS: Female athletes who completed the LEFT in $118 s were 6 times more likely (OR=6.4, 95% CI: 1.3, 31.7) to sustain a thigh or knee injury.
  • Male athletes who completed the LEFT in #100 s were more likely to experience a time-loss injury to the low back or LE (OR=3.2, 95% CI: 1.1, 9.5) or a foot or ankle injury (OR=6.7, 95% CI: 1.5, 29.7) than male athletes who completed the LEFT in 101 s or more.
  • Female athletes with a greater than 10% side-to-side asymmetry between SLH distances had a 4-fold increase in foot or ankle injury (cut point: >10%; OR=4.4, 95% CI: 1.2, 15.4).
  • Male athletes with SLH distances (either leg) at least 75% of their height had at least a 3-fold increase (OR=3.6, 95% CI: 1.2, 11.2 for the right LE; OR=3.6, 95% CI: 1.2, 11.2 for left LE) in low back or LE injury.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The LEFT and the SLH tests appear useful in identifying Division III athletes at risk for a low back or lower extremity sports injury.
  • Thus, these tests warrant further consideration as preparticipatory screening examination tools for sport injury in this population.
  • CLINICAL RELEVANCE: The single-leg hop for distance and the lower extremity functional test, when administered to Division III athletes during the preseason, may help identify those at risk for a time-loss low back or lower extremity injury.

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  • (PMID = 23772338.001).
  • [ISSN] 2159-2896
  • [Journal-full-title] International journal of sports physical therapy
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Int J Sports Phys Ther
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3679628
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; epidemiology / functional test / lower extremity functional test / single‐leg hop
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8. |||||||||. 108%  Probst C, Richter M, Lefering R, Frink M, Gaulke R, Krettek C, Hildebrand F: Incidence and significance of injuries to the foot and ankle in polytrauma patients--an analysis of the Trauma Registry of DGU. Injury; 2010 Feb;41(2):210-5
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Incidence and significance of injuries to the foot and ankle in polytrauma patients--an analysis of the Trauma Registry of DGU.
  • BACKGROUND: Injuries to the foot and ankle are often missed or underestimated during the initial care for polytraumatized patients.
  • Nonetheless, injuries to the lower extremity exert significant influence on long-term outcome after discharge from the acute care facility.
  • Since the mortality of trauma decreased in the last decades, these injuries gain more effect on the overall outcome.
  • We analysed foot and ankle injury patterns, associated procedures and special characteristics of this population during early care.
  • METHODS: Multiply injured patients of the Trauma Registry of DGU (TR-DGU; Injury Severity Score, ISS > or = 16) with injuries to the foot and ankle (group F&A) were compared to the remaining TR-DGU population (group Non-F&A) for differences in injury characteristics, surgical treatment and early outcome.
  • RESULTS: Demographic data and injury severity were comparable between the groups.
  • The group F&A showed significantly more falls from a height above 3m and suicidal injuries.
  • Their overall injury severity to the extremities, especially to the regions different from the foot and ankle, was significantly higher compared to group Non-F&A.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Our data enhance the need for a meticulous search for injuries to the foot and ankle in patients with falls, comparably light injuries to the trunk and head and especially in patients with multiple and severe injuries to the skeletal system.
  • Since 88.4% of patients with foot and ankle injuries are discharged alive, early appropriate care should be given to these injuries that significantly affect long-term outcome.
  • [MeSH-major] Ankle Injuries / epidemiology. Foot Injuries / epidemiology. Multiple Trauma / epidemiology. Registries / statistics & numerical data
  • [MeSH-minor] Abbreviated Injury Scale. Accidental Falls / statistics & numerical data. Accidents, Traffic / statistics & numerical data. Adolescent. Adult. Aged. Female. Germany / epidemiology. Glasgow Outcome Scale. Humans. Injury Severity Score. Male. Middle Aged. Outcome Assessment (Health Care). Suicide, Attempted / statistics & numerical data. Young Adult


9. |||||..... 53%  Vormittag K, Calonje R, Briner WW: Foot and ankle injuries in the barefoot sports. Curr Sports Med Rep; 2009 Sep-Oct;8(5):262-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Foot and ankle injuries in the barefoot sports.
  • This pronation likely protects runners from injury.
  • Boardsport participants who perform their sports barefoot on the water seem to be at risk for foot and ankle injuries.
  • The high-impact forces in gymnastics place participants at risk for foot and ankle injuries, as well.
  • Swimming and diving have a low rate of foot and ankle injuries.
  • The risk of ankle sprain in beach volleyball, which is played barefoot, seems to be lower than that for indoor volleyball, played wearing shoes.
  • Martial arts place competitors at risk for injuries to the foot and ankle from torsional and impact mechanisms.
  • Athletes who hope to return to barefoot competition after injury should perform their rehabilitation in their bare feet.
  • [MeSH-major] Ankle Injuries / diagnosis. Ankle Injuries / therapy. Athletic Injuries / diagnosis. Athletic Injuries / therapy. Foot Injuries / diagnosis. Foot Injuries / therapy. Shoes


10. |||||..... 52%  Masini BD, Murray CK, Wenke JC, Hsu JR: Prevention and treatment of infected foot and ankle wounds sustained in the combat environment. Foot Ankle Clin; 2010 Mar;15(1):91-112
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  • [Title] Prevention and treatment of infected foot and ankle wounds sustained in the combat environment.
  • Combat injuries to the foot and ankle are challenging to treat due to frequent high-energy mechanisms, environmental contamination, and soft tissue and bony damage.
  • Prevention and treatment of infections in injuries to the foot and ankle are critical to achieving the goals of tissue healing and restoration of function.
  • The guidelines for treatment of these foot and ankle injuries are similar to those in place for civilians; however, allowances must be made for the realities of combat including an often austere environment, the need for evacuation, and limitations on resources available for treatment.
  • [MeSH-major] Leg Injuries / surgery. Surgical Wound Infection / therapy. War. Wound Infection / prevention & control. Wound Infection / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Ankle Injuries / complications. Ankle Injuries / surgery. Anti-Bacterial Agents / therapeutic use. Combined Modality Therapy. Debridement / methods. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Foot Injuries / complications. Foot Injuries / surgery. Fractures, Open / complications. Fractures, Open / surgery. Humans. Male. Military Medicine / standards. Military Medicine / trends. Reconstructive Surgical Procedures / methods. Risk Assessment. Soft Tissue Injuries / complications. Soft Tissue Injuries / surgery. Treatment Outcome. Wound Healing / physiology

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.
  • (PMID = 20189119.001).
  • [ISSN] 1558-1934
  • [Journal-full-title] Foot and ankle clinics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Foot Ankle Clin
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Bacterial Agents
  • [Number-of-references] 135
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11. |||||..... 49%  Dobscha SK, Clark ME, Morasco BJ, Freeman M, Campbell R, Helfand M: Systematic review of the literature on pain in patients with polytrauma including traumatic brain injury. Pain Med; 2009 Oct;10(7):1200-17
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  • [Title] Systematic review of the literature on pain in patients with polytrauma including traumatic brain injury.
  • OBJECTIVE: To review the literature addressing the assessment and management of pain in patients with polytraumatic injuries including traumatic brain injury (TBI) and blast-related headache, and to identify patient, clinician and systems factors associated with pain-related outcomes.
  • There was limited evidence that the following factors are associated with pain among TBI patients: severity, location, and multiplicity of injuries; insomnia; fatigue; depression; and post-traumatic stress disorder.
  • [MeSH-major] Brain Injuries / epidemiology. Inpatients / statistics & numerical data. Multiple Trauma / epidemiology. Pain Measurement / statistics & numerical data. Physician's Practice Patterns / statistics & numerical data

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  • (PMID = 19818031.001).
  • [ISSN] 1526-4637
  • [Journal-full-title] Pain medicine (Malden, Mass.)
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Pain Med
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIDA NIH HHS / DA / K23 DA023467-01A1; United States / NIDA NIH HHS / DA / K23 DA023467-01A1
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Meta-Analysis; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 91
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS246273; NLM/ PMC2995299
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12. |||....... 32%  Grabowski AM, D'Andrea S: Effects of a powered ankle-foot prosthesis on kinetic loading of the unaffected leg during level-ground walking. J Neuroeng Rehabil; 2013;10:49
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  • [Title] Effects of a powered ankle-foot prosthesis on kinetic loading of the unaffected leg during level-ground walking.
  • BACKGROUND: People with a lower-extremity amputation that use conventional passive-elastic ankle-foot prostheses encounter a series of stress-related challenges during walking such as greater forces on their unaffected leg, and may thus be predisposed to secondary musculoskeletal injuries such as chronic joint disorders.
  • Previous studies have hypothesized that the development of this disorder is linked to the abnormally high peak knee external adduction moments encountered during walking.
  • An ankle-foot prosthesis that supplies biomimetic power could potentially mitigate the forces and knee adduction moments applied to the unaffected leg of a person with a transtibial amputation, which could, in turn, reduce the risk of knee osteoarthritis.
  • We hypothesized that compared to using a passive-elastic prosthesis, people with a transtibial amputation using a powered ankle-foot prosthesis would have lower peak resultant ground reaction forces, peak external knee adduction moments, and corresponding loading rates applied to their unaffected leg during walking over a wide range of speeds.
  • Subjects with an amputation walked while using their own passive-elastic prosthesis and a powered ankle-foot prosthesis capable of providing net positive mechanical work and powered ankle plantar flexion during late stance.
  • CONCLUSIONS: Use of a biomimetic powered ankle-foot prosthesis decreased peak resultant force at slow and moderate speeds and knee external adduction moment at moderate and fast speeds on the unaffected leg of people with a transtibial amputation during level-ground walking.
  • Thus, use of an ankle-foot prosthesis that provides net positive mechanical work could reduce the risk of comorbidities such as knee osteoarthritis.
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Amputees. Ankle Joint / physiology. Biomechanical Phenomena. Humans. Leg / physiology. Male. Middle Aged

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  • (PMID = 23758860.001).
  • [ISSN] 1743-0003
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of neuroengineering and rehabilitation
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Neuroeng Rehabil
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
  • [Publication-country] England
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3685554
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13. |||....... 32%  Luciano Ade P, Lara LC: Epidemiological study of foot and ankle injuries in recreational sports. Acta Ortop Bras; 2012 Dec;20(6):339-42
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  • [Title] Epidemiological study of foot and ankle injuries in recreational sports.
  • OBJECTIVE: This is a retrospective study showing the incidence, type and extent of injuries occurring in the foot and/or ankle as a result of recreational sports practice.
  • METHODS: We treated 131 patients, of which 123 were male and 8 female, with a history of trauma and pain in the foot and/or ankle after the practicing recreational sports.
  • CONCLUSIONS: The sprained ankle was the most frequent type of injury, especially those of grade I and II.
  • Soccer was the sport responsible for the highest incidence of injuries and among its various forms the indoor soccer presented the highest frequency of injuries (35%).

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  • (PMID = 24453628.001).
  • [ISSN] 1413-7852
  • [Journal-full-title] Acta ortopedica brasileira
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Acta Ortop Bras
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Brazil
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3861959
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Ankle injuries / Foot injuries / Sports / Wounds and injuries
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14. |||....... 31%  Choi SC, Min YG, Lee IS, Yoon GH, Kang BR, Jung YS, Cho JP, Kim GW: Injuries associated with the 580 km university student grand voluntary road march: focus on foot injuries. J Korean Med Sci; 2013 Dec;28(12):1814-21
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  • [Title] Injuries associated with the 580 km university student grand voluntary road march: focus on foot injuries.
  • We investigated the incidence and location of blisters associated with the road march using a foot map along with other injuries.
  • Overall, 95.1% of the subjects (135 of 142) sustained one or more injuries.
  • All injured subjects had foot blisters, and 18% had other foot injuries.
  • March-related injuries, excluding foot injuries, were ankle pain (12.7%), knee pain (12.7%) and Achilles tendon pain (7.7%).
  • Six subjects (4.2%) needed extra medical treatment for more than 2 weeks prior to returning to their daily lives after completion of the march due to associated injuries.
  • The present study observed a very high incidence rate of injuries (95.1%) associated with the 580 km university students grand road march.
  • These injuries posed an obstacle against completion of the road march and against returning to daily life.
  • Active preventive interventions such as physical therapy and customized reinforced shoes and education program are recommended for reducing incidence rate and severity of injuries.

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  • (PMID = 24339714.001).
  • [ISSN] 1598-6357
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of Korean medical science
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J. Korean Med. Sci.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Korea (South)
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ PMC3857380
  • [Keywords] NOTNLM ; Blister / Foot Injuries / Incidence / Maps / Prevention / Walking
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15. |||....... 31%  Wise BL, Peloquin C, Choi H, Lane NE, Zhang Y: Impact of age, sex, obesity, and steroid use on quinolone-associated tendon disorders. Am J Med; 2012 Dec;125(12):1228.e23-1228.e28
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  • For each participant, we ascertained whether there was a prescription of a quinolone and comparison antibiotic within 30 days before the diagnosis of tendon disorder (case period) and a prescription of the same medications within 30 days 1 year before disease diagnosis (control period).
  • [MeSH-major] Anti-Bacterial Agents / adverse effects. Fluoroquinolones / adverse effects. Tendinopathy / epidemiology. Tendon Injuries / epidemiology

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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  • (PMID = 23026288.001).
  • [ISSN] 1555-7162
  • [Journal-full-title] The American journal of medicine
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Am. J. Med.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIAMS NIH HHS / AR / AR47785; United States / NICHD NIH HHS / HD / K12 HD051958; United States / NICHD NIH HHS / HD / K12HD051958; United States / NIAMS NIH HHS / AR / K24 AR048841; United States / PHS HHS / / K24 ARO48841; United States / NIAMS NIH HHS / AR / P60 AR047785
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] 0 / Anti-Bacterial Agents; 0 / Fluoroquinolones; 0 / Glucocorticoids
  • [Other-IDs] NLM/ NIHMS411486; NLM/ PMC3502655
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16. |||||..... 50%  Greenhagen RM, Johnson AR, Bevilacqua NJ: Smoking cessation: the role of the foot and ankle surgeon. Foot Ankle Spec; 2010 Feb;3(1):21-8
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  • [Title] Smoking cessation: the role of the foot and ankle surgeon.
  • These negative effects are a concern for the foot and ankle surgeon, as smoking can increase the risk of diabetes and peripheral artery disease and delay healing of surgical incisions and ulcerations of the lower extremities.
  • Smoking cessation is an important component in the overall treatment of conditions affecting the foot and ankle.
  • [MeSH-major] Lower Extremity / surgery. Patient Education as Topic. Smoking Cessation. Tobacco Use Disorder / complications
  • [MeSH-minor] Amputation. Fractures, Bone / etiology. Fractures, Bone / surgery. Humans. Osteonecrosis / etiology. Osteonecrosis / surgery. Peripheral Vascular Diseases / etiology. Physician-Patient Relations. Talus / injuries. Wound Healing / physiology

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  • (PMID = 20400436.001).
  • [ISSN] 1938-7636
  • [Journal-full-title] Foot & ankle specialist
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Foot Ankle Spec
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 51
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17. |||||..... 50%  Anderson RB, Hunt KJ, McCormick JJ: Management of common sports-related injuries about the foot and ankle. J Am Acad Orthop Surg; 2010 Sep;18(9):546-56
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Management of common sports-related injuries about the foot and ankle.
  • Foot and ankle injuries are commonplace in competitive sports.
  • Improvements in injury surveillance programs and injury reporting have enabled physicians to better recognize and manage specific foot and ankle injuries, with a primary goal of efficient and safe return to play.
  • Athletes are becoming stronger, faster, and better conditioned, and higher-energy injuries are becoming increasingly common.
  • Close attention is required during examination to accurately identify such injuries as turf toe, ankle injuries, tarsometatarsal (ie, Lisfranc) injuries, and stress fractures.
  • Early diagnosis and management of these injuries are critical.
  • [MeSH-major] Ankle Injuries / therapy. Athletic Injuries / therapy. Foot Injuries / therapy


18. |||||..... 50%  Kaplan LD, Jost PW, Honkamp N, Norwig J, West R, Bradley JP: Incidence and variance of foot and ankle injuries in elite college football players. Am J Orthop (Belle Mead NJ); 2011 Jan;40(1):40-4
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  • [Title] Incidence and variance of foot and ankle injuries in elite college football players.
  • We conducted a study on the risk for foot and ankle injuries in college football players on the basis of injury type and player position.
  • All pathologic conditions and surgical procedures of the foot and ankle were recorded, and data were analyzed by player position to detect any trends.
  • Seventy-two percent (n = 231) of the players had a history of foot and ankle injuries, with a total of 287 foot and ankle injuries (1.24 injuries/player injured).
  • The most common injuries were lateral ankle sprain (n = 115), syndesmotic sprain (50), metatarsophalangeal dislocation/turf toe (36), and fibular fracture (25).
  • Foot and ankle injuries were most common in kickers/punters (100% incidence), special teams (100%), running backs (83%), wide receivers (83%), and offensive linemen (80%).
  • Lateral ankle sprains, the most common injuries, were treated surgically only 2.6% of the time.
  • Foot and ankle injuries are common in collegiate football players, affecting 72% of players.
  • Trends are seen in the types of injuries for the different player positions.
  • [MeSH-major] Ankle Injuries / epidemiology. Athletic Injuries / epidemiology. Foot Injuries / epidemiology. Football


19. |||||..... 50%  Werner RA, Gell N, Hartigan A, Wiggermann N, Keyserling WM: Risk factors for foot and ankle disorders among assembly plant workers. Am J Ind Med; 2010 Dec;53(12):1233-9
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  • [Title] Risk factors for foot and ankle disorders among assembly plant workers.
  • BACKGROUND: Jobs that necessitate prolonged standing and walking activities are commonly associated with worker's complaints of foot and ankle pain.
  • The objective of this study was to determine the relative contributions of work activity (time spent standing, walking, or sitting), floor surface characteristics, weight, BMI, age, foot biomechanics, and other demographic and medical history factors to the prevalence of foot and ankle disorders.
  • The main outcome variable was foot or ankle disorders defined by pain and a positive physical examination.
  • The independent variables included baseline demographics, medical history, ergonomic exposures, psychosocial factors, shoe characteristics and foot biomechanics.
  • RESULTS: Twenty-four percent of the cohort met the case definition of foot/ankle disorder with 10% defined as new cases.
  • Fifty-two percent had symptoms of foot/ankle.
  • An increased risk of presenting with foot/ankle disorders was associated with high metatarsal pressure on gait assessment, increased time spent walking, female gender, reported high job dissatisfaction, a history of rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis or vascular disorder.
  • For the truck/forklift drivers, an increased number of times getting in and out of the vehicle was associated with a higher prevalence of ankle/foot problems.
  • [MeSH-major] Ankle Injuries / epidemiology. Arthralgia / epidemiology. Foot Injuries / epidemiology. Occupational Diseases / epidemiology. Occupational Exposure / adverse effects


20. |||||..... 50%  Ramasamy A, Hill AM, Masouros S, Gibb I, Phillip R, Bull AM, Clasper JC: Outcomes of IED foot and ankle blast injuries. J Bone Joint Surg Am; 2013 Mar 6;95(5):e25
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  • [Title] Outcomes of IED foot and ankle blast injuries.
  • BACKGROUND: Improvements in protection and medical treatments have resulted in increasing numbers of modern-warfare casualties surviving with complex lower-extremity injuries.
  • To our knowledge, there has been no prior analysis of foot and ankle blast injuries as a result of improvised explosive devices (IEDs).
  • The aims of this study were to report the pattern of injury and determine which factors are associated with a poor clinical outcome.
  • METHODS: U.K. service personnel who had sustained lower leg injuries following an under-vehicle explosion from January 2006 to December 2008 were identified with the use of a prospective trauma registry.
  • Patient demographics, injury severity, the nature of the lower leg injury, and the type of clinical management were recorded.
  • RESULTS: Sixty-three U.K. service personnel (eighty-nine injured limbs) with lower leg injuries from an explosion were identified.
  • Fifty-one percent of the casualties sustained multisegmental injuries to the foot and ankle.
  • Twenty-six legs (29%) required amputation, with six of them amputated because of chronic pain eighteen months following injury.
  • Regression analysis revealed that hindfoot injuries, open fractures, and vascular injuries were independent predictors of amputation.
  • At the time of final follow-up, sixty-six (74%) of the injured limbs had persisting symptoms related to the injury, and only nine (14%) of the service members were fit to return to their preinjury duties.
  • CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that foot and ankle injuries from IEDs are associated with a high amputation rate and frequently with a poor clinical outcome.
  • [MeSH-major] Amputation / statistics & numerical data. Ankle Injuries / surgery. Blast Injuries / surgery. Foot Injuries / surgery. Limb Salvage / statistics & numerical data
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Afghan Campaign 2001-. Bombs. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Injury Severity Score. Iraq War, 2003-2011. Logistic Models. Postoperative Complications / epidemiology. Postoperative Complications / surgery. Recovery of Function. Registries. Retrospective Studies. Risk Factors. Treatment Outcome


21. |||||..... 50%  Yu G, Zhao H: [Progress and main points in treatment of acute foot and ankle injuries]. Zhongguo Xiu Fu Chong Jian Wai Ke Za Zhi; 2011 Jul;25(7):769-73
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  • [Title] [Progress and main points in treatment of acute foot and ankle injuries].
  • OBJECTIVE: To give a review and commentary on the treatment of acute foot and ankle injuries.
  • METHODS: Based on the treatment experience and recent literature, a commentary on acute foot and ankles injuries were given, included the basic and clinical research results, evaluation before operation, and treatment methods of the soft tissue and bone injuries.
  • RESULTS: The treatment of acute foot and ankle injuries is still a hot point in orthopaedic surgery.
  • The time delay between first debridement and injury within 24 hours does not increase the infection rate.
  • For the treatment of severe ankle fractures, attentions should be paid to the cartilage injury, and anatomic reduction, good realignment, and the congruity recovery are very important.
  • The treatment determination of calcaneal fractures depends on the fully understanding injury mechanisms, classifications, and treatment method.
  • Operation and fixation methods of Lisfranc injury depends on different injury types.
  • CONCLUSION: Acute foot and ankle injuries are common in clinical, to achieve a satisfactory result in evaluation and treatment, it is important to have a fully evaluation of the injury type, and choose best operation time and suitable treatment methods, as well as to fully understand the biomechanical characteristics of different regions.
  • [MeSH-major] Ankle Injuries / therapy. Foot Injuries / therapy
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Tendon Injuries

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  • (PMID = 21818935.001).
  • [ISSN] 1002-1892
  • [Journal-full-title] Zhongguo xiu fu chong jian wai ke za zhi = Zhongguo xiufu chongjian waike zazhi = Chinese journal of reparative and reconstructive surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Zhongguo Xiu Fu Chong Jian Wai Ke Za Zhi
  • [Language] chi
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] China
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22. |||||..... 50%  Oztekin HH, Boya H, Ozcan O, Zeren B, Pinar P: Foot and ankle injuries and time lost from play in professional soccer players. Foot (Edinb); 2009 Mar;19(1):22-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Foot and ankle injuries and time lost from play in professional soccer players.
  • BACKGROUND: Ankle and foot injuries are common in professional soccer players, but the relation among diagnosis, severity and time lost from play is not well known.
  • OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship among diagnosis, injury severity and time lost to play of professional soccer players with severe ankle and foot injuries with reviewing the recent literature.
  • PATIENTS AND METHODS: Collected data of 66 players with severe ankle and foot injuries were included in the study.
  • Type of injury, diagnosis, treatment, injury severity and finally, time lost from play were evaluated from the medical records.
  • Injury severity ('severe' if >28 days, 'moderate' if between 8 and 28 days) and time lost from play were calculated from medical records and by telephone interviews with the players.
  • RESULTS: Most injuries (n=20, 32%) occurred during player-to-player contact.
  • The most common diagnosis was ankle sprain (30.3%) with anterior talofibular ligament injury.
  • Most (55%) hindfoot injuries were Achilles tendinopathy with or without rupture.
  • The mean time lost from play for players with severe foot and ankle injuries was 61 days (range 21-240 days); after Achilles tendon ruptures, the mean time lost was 180 days.
  • Injury severity was severe (>28 days lost from play) in 64% patients and moderate (8-28 days lost from play) in 36% patients.
  • CONCLUSION: Time lost to play can dramatically increase by the presence of severe ankle and foot injuries.
  • Serious ankle and foot injuries in this study resulted in players being out of professional competition for about 2 months.
  • [MeSH-major] Ankle Injuries / complications. Foot Injuries / complications. Soccer / injuries
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Humans. Injury Severity Score. Male. Retrospective Studies. Time Factors. Young Adult


23. |||||..... 50%  Lantry JM, Perumal V, Roberts CS: Can patterns of segmental injuries of the foot and ankle predict amputation and disability? J Surg Orthop Adv; 2009;18(3):134-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Can patterns of segmental injuries of the foot and ankle predict amputation and disability?
  • The purpose of the study was to determine the risk of digital or distal segmental amputation and permanent unemployment in patients with these injury patterns.
  • A retrospective chart review of 23 patients with multiple, ipsilateral injuries of the foot and ankle was performed.
  • Amputations occurred in five patients (21.7%) and were most common in those with three-level injuries.
  • Odds ratios showed that patients with an amputation were 9.75 times more likely to have a three-level injury than a two-level injury.
  • It was concluded that patients with segmental foot and ankle injuries are at risk for amputation of the distal portion of the involved extremity and inability to return to their preinjury employment level (disability).
  • [MeSH-major] Amputation. Ankle Injuries / surgery. Foot Injuries / surgery. Fractures, Open / surgery. Injury Severity Score. Sick Leave

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  • (PMID = 19843438.001).
  • [ISSN] 1548-825X
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of surgical orthopaedic advances
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Surg Orthop Adv
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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24. |||||..... 50%  Soomekh DJ: New technology and techniques in the treatment of foot and ankle injuries. Clin Podiatr Med Surg; 2011 Jan;28(1):19-41
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] New technology and techniques in the treatment of foot and ankle injuries.
  • The advancement of new technologies in the treatment of foot and ankle injuries seems exponential over the last several years.
  • Foot and ankle injuries are commonplace in competitive sports.
  • This article provides an overview of the diagnosis and treatment, including surgical techniques, of common foot and ankle injuries.
  • [MeSH-major] Ankle Injuries / diagnosis. Ankle Injuries / therapy. Foot Injuries / diagnosis. Foot Injuries / therapy. Orthopedic Procedures / trends
  • [MeSH-minor] Diagnostic Imaging / methods. Female. Forecasting. Humans. Injury Severity Score. Male. Recovery of Function. Risk Factors. Treatment Outcome

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 21276516.001).
  • [ISSN] 1558-2302
  • [Journal-full-title] Clinics in podiatric medicine and surgery
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Clin Podiatr Med Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
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25. |||||..... 50%  Khan W, Oragui E, Akagha E: Common fractures and injuries of the ankle and foot: functional anatomy, imaging, classification and management. J Perioper Pract; 2010 Jul;20(7):249-58
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  • [Title] Common fractures and injuries of the ankle and foot: functional anatomy, imaging, classification and management.
  • The ankle and foot are functionally important and complex joints.
  • Bony fractures and ligamentous injuries are common.
  • In this review paper we will discuss the functional anatomy, imaging, classification and the management of common ankle and foot injuries including ankle fractures, Achilles tendon ruptures, Lisfranc joint injuries, calcaneo fractures and fractures of the metatarsals and phalanges.
  • [MeSH-major] Ankle Injuries. Foot Injuries. Fractures, Bone


26. |||||..... 50%  Wallace RF, Wahi MM, Hill OT, Kay AB: Rates of ankle and foot injuries in active-duty U.S. Army soldiers, 2000-2006. Mil Med; 2011 Mar;176(3):283-90
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  • [Title] Rates of ankle and foot injuries in active-duty U.S. Army soldiers, 2000-2006.
  • Ankle and foot injuries (AFI) are a major cause of Active-Duty Army (ADA) soldiers' time lost from training and combat operations.
  • We used the Total Army Injury and Health Outcomes Database to compute the rates of AFI to identify high-risk ADA groups for the years 2000-2006.
  • Yearly, 60% to 70% of ADA soldiers with AFI had an ankle sprain/strain, and ankle sprain/strain had the highest 7-year rate of all AFIs (103 per 1,000).
  • [MeSH-major] Ankle Injuries / epidemiology. Foot Injuries / epidemiology. Military Personnel / statistics & numerical data


27. |||||..... 50%  Owens JG: Physical therapy of the patient with foot and ankle injuries sustained in combat. Foot Ankle Clin; 2010 Mar;15(1):175-86
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  • [Title] Physical therapy of the patient with foot and ankle injuries sustained in combat.
  • Polytrauma from high-energy blasts are common and frequently associated with mangled extremities, axial fractures, and traumatic brain injuries.
  • This article highlights the challenges encountered and techniques used in the rehabilitation of soldiers with foot and ankle injuries sustained in recent combat operations.
  • [MeSH-major] Ankle Injuries / rehabilitation. Blast Injuries / rehabilitation. Foot Injuries / rehabilitation. Physical Therapy Modalities. War
  • [MeSH-minor] Afghan Campaign 2001-. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Injury Severity Score. Iraq War, 2003-2011. Male. Muscle Strength / physiology. Range of Motion, Articular / physiology. Recovery of Function. Treatment Outcome

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  • [Copyright] Published by Elsevier Inc.
  • (PMID = 20189123.001).
  • [ISSN] 1558-1934
  • [Journal-full-title] Foot and ankle clinics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Foot Ankle Clin
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 26
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28. |||||..... 50%  Teh J, Suppiah R, Sharp R, Newton J: Imaging in the assessment and management of overuse injuries in the foot and ankle. Semin Musculoskelet Radiol; 2011 Feb;15(1):101-14
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Imaging in the assessment and management of overuse injuries in the foot and ankle.
  • Overuse injuries of the ankle and foot are common in the general and athletic populations.
  • The wide spectrum of overuse injuries includes ligamentous injuries, soft tissue and osseous impingement, osteochondral lesions, tendon injuries, and stress fractures.
  • Some conditions such as impingement syndromes and stress fractures may be missed on initial physical examination, and patients with such injuries often present to a sports or orthopedic clinic with persistent symptoms.
  • With the increasing participation in sports, health-care professionals involved in the care of athletes at all levels must have a thorough understanding of overuse conditions of the foot and ankle, and the use of imaging in the management of these conditions.
  • This article covers the clinical presentation, pertinent anatomy, imaging features, and management of overuse injuries of the foot and ankle.
  • [MeSH-major] Ankle Injuries / diagnosis. Ankle Injuries / therapy. Athletic Injuries / diagnosis. Athletic Injuries / therapy. Cumulative Trauma Disorders / diagnosis. Cumulative Trauma Disorders / therapy. Diagnostic Imaging. Foot Injuries / diagnosis. Foot Injuries / therapy


29. |||||..... 49%  Farrugia P, Goldstein C, Petrisor BA: Measuring foot and ankle injury outcomes: common scales and checklists. Injury; 2011 Mar;42(3):276-80
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Measuring foot and ankle injury outcomes: common scales and checklists.
  • Whilst outcome measures can be generic, there are a number of foot and ankle specific measures available and in use.
  • Continued work however is being done in this area and these challenges provide opportunities for further investigation into the role of functional outcome scores specific to the foot and ankle.
  • [MeSH-major] Ankle Injuries. Foot Injuries. Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

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  • [Copyright] Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 21232744.001).
  • [ISSN] 1879-0267
  • [Journal-full-title] Injury
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Injury
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] Netherlands
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30. |||||..... 49%  Chiu HJ, Chan CL, Hsu JC, Chung CY, Yu IL, Renn JH, Chang NT, Yang NP: Nationwide retrospective cohort survey of orthopedic injuries in members of the Taiwanese population with psychiatric disorders, 2000-2005. J Orthop Sci; 2013 May;18(3):456-64
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Nationwide retrospective cohort survey of orthopedic injuries in members of the Taiwanese population with psychiatric disorders, 2000-2005.
  • BACKGROUND: The relationship between psychiatric disorders and musculoskeletal injuries is interesting but has not been investigated in depth.
  • Another cohort-based case-control study was designed, and one sex-matched and age-matched (1:1) control group randomly selected from the population without any prevalent psychiatric disorder in 2000 and incident psychiatric disorder in 2001-2005 was used for comparison.
  • RESULTS: 64,662 Taiwanese people with any prevalent psychiatric disorder were enrolled in this study in 2000.
  • The 6-year cumulative incidences of orthopedic injuries were 13.61/10,000 for femoral neck/femur fracture and 4.64/10,000, 3.40/10,000, 3.25/10,000, and 3.09/10,000 for radius/ulna or hand fracture, tibia/fibula or patella fracture, ankle or foot fracture, and humeral fracture, respectively.
  • Compared with the control group, this Taiwanese population with prevalent psychiatric disorders had fewer incidences of all orthopedic injuries during the 6 years since 2000, and their cumulative incidence ratios ranged from 0.04 to 0.4 for the different injury sites.
  • CONCLUSION: Subjects with prevalent psychiatric disorders had fewer occurrences of orthopedic injuries than the general population.


31. |||||..... 49%  Frost A, Roach R: Osteochondral injuries of the foot and ankle. Sports Med Arthrosc; 2009 Jun;17(2):87-93
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Osteochondral injuries of the foot and ankle.
  • Osteochondral injuries commonly affect the ankle joint and involve the dome of the talus.
  • This article describes the etiology and pathogenesis of these injuries.
  • Their clinical presentation is described and advice is given on how to diagnose and investigate suspected osteochondral injuries.
  • [MeSH-major] Ankle Injuries. Athletic Injuries. Cartilage / injuries. Foot Injuries. Orthopedic Procedures / methods


32. |||||..... 49%  Hanlon DP: Leg, ankle, and foot injuries. Emerg Med Clin North Am; 2010 Nov;28(4):885-905
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Leg, ankle, and foot injuries.
  • The emergency provider (EP) must be aware of the anatomy of the leg, ankle, and foot.
  • The varied presentation of common injuries must be recognized as well as the unique presentations of uncommon injuries.
  • The astute EP must rely on a focused history and a precise examination to avoid the pitfalls and missed injuries from an over-reliance on radiographic studies.
  • Potential complications associated with these injuries must be anticipated and avoided if possible.
  • [MeSH-major] Ankle Injuries / diagnosis. Foot Injuries / diagnosis. Orthopedic Procedures / methods. Trauma Centers / organization & administration
  • [MeSH-minor] Humans. Leg Injuries / diagnosis. Leg Injuries / therapy. United States

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 20971396.001).
  • [ISSN] 1558-0539
  • [Journal-full-title] Emergency medicine clinics of North America
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Emerg. Med. Clin. North Am.
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
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33. |||||..... 49%  Ursone RL: Unique complications of foot and ankle injuries secondary to warfare. Foot Ankle Clin; 2010 Mar;15(1):201-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Unique complications of foot and ankle injuries secondary to warfare.
  • This article discusses the common complications associated with lower extremity trauma and amputations secondary to combat injuries.
  • Although there is some literature on these topics, most is based on noncombat injuries, indicating a need for further research into the management of these devastating injuries.
  • [MeSH-major] Blast Injuries / complications. Fracture Fixation, Internal / adverse effects. Leg Injuries / complications. Leg Injuries / surgery. War
  • [MeSH-minor] Amputation / adverse effects. Ankle Injuries / complications. Ankle Injuries / surgery. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Foot Injuries / complications. Foot Injuries / surgery. Humans. Incidence. Male. Postoperative Complications / diagnosis. Postoperative Complications / epidemiology. Reconstructive Surgical Procedures / adverse effects. Reconstructive Surgical Procedures / methods. Risk Assessment. Surgical Wound Infection / diagnosis. Surgical Wound Infection / epidemiology. Wound Healing / physiology

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  • [Copyright] Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 20189125.001).
  • [ISSN] 1558-1934
  • [Journal-full-title] Foot and ankle clinics
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Foot Ankle Clin
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Number-of-references] 44
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34. |||||..... 49%  Hudson Z: Rehabilitation and return to play after foot and ankle injuries in athletes. Sports Med Arthrosc; 2009 Sep;17(3):203-7
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Rehabilitation and return to play after foot and ankle injuries in athletes.
  • Rehabilitation after acute ankle injury can be categorized in to early, middle, and late phases.
  • This paper aims to cover some of the key concepts from initial management to end stage rehabilitation that could be applied to many musculoskeletal injuries around the foot and ankle.
  • [MeSH-major] Ankle Injuries / rehabilitation. Athletic Injuries / rehabilitation. Foot Injuries / rehabilitation


35. |||||..... 49%  Nazarenko A, Beltran LS, Bencardino JT: Imaging evaluation of traumatic ligamentous injuries of the ankle and foot. Radiol Clin North Am; 2013 May;51(3):455-78
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Imaging evaluation of traumatic ligamentous injuries of the ankle and foot.
  • Sports ankle injuries are very common worldwide.
  • In the United States, it is estimated that 2 million acute ankle sprains occur each year, averaging to $318 to $914 per sprain.
  • Magnetic resonance imaging is excellent for depicting normal ankle anatomy and can elegantly demonstrate ligamentous injuries of the ankle and associated conditions after ankle sprain.
  • This article encompasses epidemiology, biomechanics, normal anatomy, and pathologic conditions of the ankle and foot ligaments.
  • The specific ligaments discussed include the syndesmotic ligaments, lateral ligament complex of the ankle, deltoid ligament, spring ligament, ligaments of the sinus tarsi, and the Lisfranc ligament.
  • [MeSH-major] Ankle Injuries / diagnosis. Athletic Injuries / diagnosis. Foot Injuries / diagnosis. Ligaments, Articular / injuries. Magnetic Resonance Imaging / methods


36. |||||..... 49%  Orr J, Kirk KL, Antunez V, Ficke J: Reverse sural artery flap for reconstruction of blast injuries of the foot and ankle. Foot Ankle Int; 2010 Jan;31(1):59-64
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Reverse sural artery flap for reconstruction of blast injuries of the foot and ankle.
  • BACKGROUND: The reverse sural artery fasciocutaneous flap is a versatile soft tissue coverage procedure for traumatic soft tissue defects of the distal tibia, ankle, and foot.
  • War-related blast injuries represent a unique injury mechanism.
  • There are no reports on use of this reconstructive flap in treating highly contaminated war-related musculoskeletal trauma of the foot and ankle.
  • The current study presents results using this soft tissue coverage procedure in a subacute fashion to treat a population of war-related blast injuries.
  • All injuries occurred between 2003 and 2008 as a result of severe war-related blast injuries.
  • RESULTS: All ten patients sustained Gustilo Type IIIB open fractures within the zones of injuries secondary to high energy blasts.
  • Average time to flap coverage was 37 (range, 18 to 112) days post-injury.
  • CONCLUSION: In appropriately selected patients with significant open bony and soft tissue trauma to the foot and ankle, the reverse sural artery fasciocutaneous flap should be considered as a viable first option for soft tissue coverage, even in cases of subacute coverage.
  • [MeSH-major] Ankle Injuries / surgery. Blast Injuries / surgery. Foot Injuries / surgery. Surgical Flaps / blood supply

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  • (PMID = 20067724.001).
  • [ISSN] 1071-1007
  • [Journal-full-title] Foot & ankle international. / American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society [and] Swiss Foot and Ankle Society
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Foot Ankle Int
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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37. |||||..... 49%  Terrier P, Dériaz O, Meichtry A, Luthi F: Prescription footwear for severe injuries of foot and ankle: effect on regularity and symmetry of the gait assessed by trunk accelerometry. Gait Posture; 2009 Nov;30(4):492-6
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Prescription footwear for severe injuries of foot and ankle: effect on regularity and symmetry of the gait assessed by trunk accelerometry.
  • After foot and/or ankle fracture, the restoration of optimal gait symmetry is one of the criteria of recovery.
  • Sixteen adult patients with persistent disability after ankle and/or foot fractures performed two 30-s walking trials with and without prescription footwear (insoles and stabilizing shoes).
  • [MeSH-major] Ankle Injuries / rehabilitation. Foot Injuries / rehabilitation. Fractures, Bone / rehabilitation. Gait / physiology. Orthotic Devices. Shoes


38. |||||..... 49%  Zhao G, Cao XC, Sang CL, Zheng JL, Cai JF: Application of a fasciocutaneous free flap for treatment of a severe soft tissue injury of the foot and ankle: a case report. J Foot Ankle Surg; 2009 Nov-Dec;48(6):691.e1-4
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Application of a fasciocutaneous free flap for treatment of a severe soft tissue injury of the foot and ankle: a case report.
  • The authors report an unusual case wherein a fasciocutaneous free flap from an amputated upper limb was used to repair a severe soft tissue injury of the ipsilateral forefoot and ankle.
  • Three years after the injury, the patient was able to maintain balance and ambulate without assistance on the reconstructed lower extremity.
  • [MeSH-major] Ankle Injuries / surgery. Burns, Electric / surgery. Fascia / transplantation. Foot Injuries / surgery. Skin Transplantation / methods. Soft Tissue Injuries / surgery. Surgical Flaps

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  • (PMID = 19857831.001).
  • [ISSN] 1542-2224
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of foot and ankle surgery : official publication of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Foot Ankle Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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39. |||||..... 49%  Chhabra A, Soldatos T, Chalian M, Faridian-Aragh N, Fritz J, Fayad LM, Carrino JA, Schon L: 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of posterior tibial tendon dysfunction with relevance to clinical staging. J Foot Ankle Surg; 2011 May-Jun;50(3):320-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • The posterior tibial tendon (PTT) is the most important dynamic stabilizer of the medial ankle and longitudinal arch of the foot.
  • PTT dysfunction is a degenerative disorder of the tendon, which secondarily involves multiple ligaments, joint capsules, fascia, articulations, and bony structures of the ankle, hindfoot, midfoot, and forefoot.
  • [MeSH-major] Magnetic Resonance Imaging / instrumentation. Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction / diagnosis. Tendon Injuries / diagnosis

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  • [Copyright] Copyright © 2011 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • (PMID = 21459628.001).
  • [ISSN] 1542-2224
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of foot and ankle surgery : official publication of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Foot Ankle Surg
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Case Reports; Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
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40. |||||..... 49%  Sammarco VJ, Sammarco GJ, Henning C, Chaim S: Surgical repair of acute and chronic tibialis anterior tendon ruptures. J Bone Joint Surg Am; 2009 Feb;91(2):325-32
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • BACKGROUND: Rupture of the tibialis anterior tendon is an uncommon disorder that can cause a substantial functional deficit as a result of loss of ankle dorsiflexion strength.
  • We are not aware of any reports on a large clinical series of patients undergoing surgical repair of this injury.
  • Early repair was performed for one traumatic and seven atraumatic ruptures three days to six weeks after the injury.
  • Patients were reassessed clinically and with the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society hindfoot score at an average of 53.3 months after surgery.
  • Ankle dorsiflexion strength was graded clinically as 5/5 in fifteen of the nineteen cases.
  • Three patients regained 4/5 ankle dorsiflexion strength, and one patient had 3/5 strength with a poor clinical result.
  • [MeSH-major] Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction / surgery. Tendon Injuries / surgery
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Aged. Ankle Joint / physiopathology. Female. Gait. Humans. Lacerations / surgery. Male. Middle Aged. Muscle Strength. Orthopedic Procedures. Recovery of Function. Retrospective Studies. Rupture. Treatment Outcome. Young Adult

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  • (PMID = 19181976.001).
  • [ISSN] 1535-1386
  • [Journal-full-title] The Journal of bone and joint surgery. American volume
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Bone Joint Surg Am
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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41. |||||..... 49%  Brockwell J, Yeung Y, Griffith JF: Stress fractures of the foot and ankle. Sports Med Arthrosc; 2009 Sep;17(3):149-59
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Stress fractures of the foot and ankle.
  • Stress fractures are common athletic injuries of the foot and ankle, described in every bone except the lesser toes, and reviewed here.
  • Early clinical presentations can be subtle, so a high degree of suspicion and a systematic approach, coupled with an understanding of the diagnostic limitations present in early injury, is required.
  • [MeSH-major] Ankle Injuries / diagnosis. Athletic Injuries / diagnosis. Foot Injuries / diagnosis. Fractures, Stress / diagnosis


42. |||||..... 49%  Petscavage J, Baker SR, Clarkin K, Luk L: Overuse of concomitant foot radiographic series in patients sustaining minor ankle injuries. Emerg Radiol; 2010 Jul;17(4):261-5
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Overuse of concomitant foot radiographic series in patients sustaining minor ankle injuries.
  • Radiographic series of the foot are often obtained in conjunction with ankle X-rays when the clinical presentation is limited to trauma to the ankle.
  • The Ottawa Ankle and Foot Rules were established in 1992 and serve as reliable guidelines to determine when an ankle or foot series is warranted in patients who have sustained minor ankle and/or foot injury.
  • We retrospectively reviewed radiographic studies of all patients over a period of 18 months who simultaneously had ankle and foot plain radiographs performed for acute complaints limited to the ankle alone.
  • Of the 243 patients who met our inclusion criteria, 55 patients had fractures, 46 in or near the ankle joint, and nine which were located at the base of the fifth metatarsal bone.
  • No fractures or dislocations were noted elsewhere in the foot.
  • All of the fifth metatarsal fractures were evident on adequately performed ankle series.
  • Our findings suggest that films of the foot are not necessary when trauma is limited to the ankle and when an appropriately performed ankle series has been completed.
  • [MeSH-major] Ankle Injuries / radiography. Decision Support Techniques. Unnecessary Procedures

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  • (PMID = 19834751.001).
  • [ISSN] 1438-1435
  • [Journal-full-title] Emergency radiology
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Emerg Radiol
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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43. |||||..... 49%  Hirschmann MT, Davda K, Rasch H, Arnold MP, Friederich NF: Clinical value of combined single photon emission computerized tomography and conventional computer tomography (SPECT/CT) in sports medicine. Sports Med Arthrosc; 2011 Jun;19(2):174-81
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [MeSH-minor] Ankle Injuries / radiography. Carpal Bones / abnormalities. Carpal Bones / radiography. Female. Foot Deformities, Congenital. Foot Injuries / radiography. Fractures, Closed / radiography. Hand Deformities, Congenital. Hip Injuries / radiography. Humans. Knee Injuries / radiography. Male. Osteochondritis Dissecans / radiography. Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome / radiography. Stapes / abnormalities. Synostosis / radiography. Tarsal Bones / abnormalities. Tarsal Bones / radiography

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  • (PMID = 21540716.001).
  • [ISSN] 1538-1951
  • [Journal-full-title] Sports medicine and arthroscopy review
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Sports Med Arthrosc
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article; Review
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Chemical-registry-number] NOG-Related-Symphalangism Spectrum Disorder
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44. |||||..... 49%  Hawson ST: Physical therapy and rehabilitation of the foot and ankle in the athlete. Clin Podiatr Med Surg; 2011 Jan;28(1):189-201
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Physical therapy and rehabilitation of the foot and ankle in the athlete.
  • Foot and ankle injuries in athletes are common.
  • Physical therapy plays a fundamental role in the management of sports injuries.
  • The purpose of this article is to (1) raise awareness for using physical therapy for treatment of foot and ankle injuries in athletes, (2) discuss considerations specific to athletes during the rehabilitation process, and (3) increase the reader's knowledge about the in-depth role of physical therapy in the management of foot and ankle injuries in athletes.
  • [MeSH-major] Ankle Injuries / rehabilitation. Athletic Injuries / rehabilitation. Foot Injuries / rehabilitation. Physical Therapy Modalities
  • [MeSH-minor] Adolescent. Adult. Exercise Therapy / methods. Female. Follow-Up Studies. Humans. Injury Severity Score. Male. Range of Motion, Articular / physiology. Recovery of Function. Treatment Outcome. Young Adult


45. |||||..... 49%  Soomekh DJ: Current concepts for the use of platelet-rich plasma in the foot and ankle. Clin Podiatr Med Surg; 2011 Jan;28(1):155-70
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Current concepts for the use of platelet-rich plasma in the foot and ankle.
  • Its use has become more popularized over the last several years in the treatment of foot and ankle injuries.
  • It has been studied and used for the treatment of tendon injuries, chronic wounds, ligamentous injuries, cartilage injuries, muscle injuries, and bone augmentation.
  • The results from in vitro and in vivo studies in foot and ankle injuries are promising.
  • The applications for treatment in the foot and ankle may be broader than once thought.
  • [MeSH-major] Achilles Tendon / injuries. Ankle Injuries / therapy. Biological Products / therapeutic use. Foot Injuries / therapy. Platelet-Rich Plasma


46. |||||..... 49%  Zagrocki L, Ross A, Hicks A: Management of degloving injuries of the lower extremity: a case report of a forklift injury. Foot Ankle Spec; 2013 Apr;6(2):150-3
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Management of degloving injuries of the lower extremity: a case report of a forklift injury.
  • Soft-tissue injuries of the foot and ankle can vary from crushing to penetrating mechanisms.
  • Degloving injuries of the lower extremity are the result of an entrapment between a fixed surface and a moving object.
  • These injuries pose significant morbidity and potential complications (eg, infection) to the patient if prompt wound coverage is not initiated.
  • The authors present a case of an extensive degloving injury to the foot, ankle, and lower leg from a forklift accident.
  • [MeSH-major] Leg Injuries / therapy. Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy / methods. Reconstructive Surgical Procedures / methods. Soft Tissue Injuries / therapy. Surgical Flaps


47. |||||..... 49%  Pedrini G, Cardi M, Landini A, Strada G: Management of severe open ankle-foot trauma by a simple external fixation technique: an alternative during war and in resource-poor and low-technology environments. J Orthop Trauma; 2011 Mar;25(3):180-7
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Management of severe open ankle-foot trauma by a simple external fixation technique: an alternative during war and in resource-poor and low-technology environments.
  • Severe open foot and ankle injuries are still a challenge for the orthopaedic surgeon.
  • The authors describe an inexpensive, rapid, minimally invasive, and easy-to-apply external fixation technique for the treatment of severe open ankle-foot fractures.
  • With the main goal of soft tissue management rather than definitive treatment of any bony injuries, this technique was developed over time during many consecutive missions in Sierra Leone and Afghanistan as an alternative to more appropriate treatments with surprisingly satisfactory short- and long-term results.
  • [MeSH-major] Ankle Injuries / therapy. Biomedical Technology. External Fixators. Foot Injuries / therapy. Fracture Fixation / methods. Fractures, Open / therapy. Resource Allocation / methods. Soft Tissue Injuries / therapy

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  • (PMID = 21321510.001).
  • [ISSN] 1531-2291
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of orthopaedic trauma
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Orthop Trauma
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] United States
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48. |||||..... 49%  Molics B, Kránicz J, Schmidt B, Sebestyén A, Nyárády J, Boncz I: [Utilization of physiotherapy services for traumatic disorders of the lower extremity in ambulatory care]. Orv Hetil; 2013 Jun 23;154(25):985-92
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • INTRODUCTION: Limited information is available on physiotherapy treatment of lower extremity injuries.
  • AIM: The purpose of this study included analysis of the utilization of outpatient physiotherapy services in case of injuries of the lower extremity.
  • The number of cases undergoing physiotherapy activities after lower extremity injuries were determined.
  • Results: In 2009 the average number of cases undergoing physiotherapy activities following lower extremity injuries per 10,000 persons were the following: "hip and thigh injuries" 249.75 male cases and 443.7 female cases; "knee and leg injuries" 927.64 male cases and 668.25 female cases, and "ankle and foot injuries" 307.58 male cases and 245.75 female cases.
  • CONCLUSIONS: According to this study, the number of physiotherapy activities for patients with injuries of the lower extremity showed significant differences between genders.
  • [MeSH-major] Ambulatory Care. Leg Injuries / therapy. Outpatients / statistics & numerical data. Physical Therapy Modalities / utilization
  • [MeSH-minor] Adult. Age Distribution. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Ankle Injuries / therapy. Female. Femoral Fractures / therapy. Foot Injuries / therapy. Humans. Hungary / epidemiology. Knee Injuries / therapy. Male. Middle Aged. Sex Distribution. Sex Factors. Tibial Fractures / therapy

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  • (PMID = 23774806.001).
  • [ISSN] 0030-6002
  • [Journal-full-title] Orvosi hetilap
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Orv Hetil
  • [Language] hun
  • [Publication-type] English Abstract; Journal Article
  • [Publication-country] Hungary
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49. |||||..... 49%  Goldstein CL, Schemitsch E, Bhandari M, Mathew G, Petrisor BA: Comparison of different outcome instruments following foot and ankle trauma. Foot Ankle Int; 2010 Dec;31(12):1075-80
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] Comparison of different outcome instruments following foot and ankle trauma.
  • BACKGROUND: Identifying optimal treatment strategies in patients with traumatic foot and ankle injuries has been hampered by the use of multiple available outcome measures with unproven reliability and validity.
  • This prospective observational study aimed to measure the correlation between six functional outcome measures in patients with traumatic foot and ankle injuries.
  • MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients 18 years of age or older with a traumatic foot or ankle injury completed the Short Form-12 (SF-12), Short Musculoskeletal Functional Assessment (SMFA), Foot Function Index (FFI), Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM), American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons (AAOS), Foot and Ankle Questionnaire and American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) Ankle-Hindfoot Scale at a single followup visit.
  • The strongest correlations were found between the SMFA, FFI, FAAM and AAOS Foot and Ankle Questionnaire.
  • CONCLUSION: High correlations between scores on six commonly used functional outcome instruments suggest it is likely unnecessary to use more than one instrument when examining functional outcome in patients with traumatic foot and ankle injuries.
  • [MeSH-major] Ankle Injuries / therapy. Foot Injuries / therapy. Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

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  • (PMID = 21189208.001).
  • [ISSN] 1071-1007
  • [Journal-full-title] Foot & ankle international. / American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society [and] Swiss Foot and Ankle Society
  • [ISO-abbreviation] Foot Ankle Int
  • [Language] eng
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • [Publication-country] United States
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50. |||||..... 49%  Ellington JK, Bosse MJ, Castillo RC, MacKenzie EJ, LEAP Study Group: The mangled foot and ankle: results from a 2-year prospective study. J Orthop Trauma; 2013 Jan;27(1):43-8
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  • [Source] The source of this record is MEDLINE®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
  • [Title] The mangled foot and ankle: results from a 2-year prospective study.
  • OBJECTIVE: To determine the outcome of the mangled foot and ankle undergoing limb salvage surgery that required free tissue flaps for wound closure compared with a similar patient foot and ankle injury group that underwent early below knee amputation (BKA).
  • One hundred seventy-four open severely injured hindfoot or ankle injuries (116 had salvage; 58 had a BKA).
  • Secondary outcomes included walking speed, number of rehospitalizations for injury-related complications, time to full weight-bearing, the visual analog pain scale, and return to work at 2 years.
  • RESULTS: When compared to patients treated with standard BKA, salvage patients who required free flaps and/or ankle arthrodesis had significantly worse 2-year outcomes.
  • CONCLUSIONS: : Patients with severe foot and ankle injuries who require free tissue transfer or ankle fusion have SIP outcomes that are significantly worse than BKA with typical skin flap design closure.
  • [MeSH-major] Amputation. Ankle Injuries / surgery. Foot Injuries / surgery. Free Tissue Flaps. Limb Salvage
  • [MeSH-minor] Cross-Sectional Studies. Humans. Injury Severity Score. Prospective Studies. Time Factors. Treatment Outcome

  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Ankle Injuries and Disorders.
  • MedlinePlus Health Information. consumer health - Foot Injuries and Disorders.
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  • (PMID = 22561743.001).
  • [ISSN] 1531-2291
  • [Journal-full-title] Journal of orthopaedic trauma
  • [ISO-abbreviation] J Orthop Trauma
  • [Language] eng
  • [Grant] United States / NIAMS NIH HHS / AR / R01-AR42659
  • [Publication-type] Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • [Publication-country] United States
  • [Investigator] MacKenzie EJ; Bosse MJ; Burgess AR; Castillo RC; Jones AL; Kellam JF; McAndrew MP; McCarthy ML; Patterson B; Sanders R; Smith DG; Starr A; Swiontkowski MF; Travison TG; Webb LX
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